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Monday, September 30
 

8:30am

Registration
Monday September 30, 2019 8:30am - 6:00pm
Atrium

9:00am

Opening
Speakers
avatar for Toby Seay

Toby Seay

Professor, Music Industry, Drexel University
Toby Seay is Professor of Music Production and Chair of the Department of Arts & Entertainment Enterprise at Drexel University. As an audio engineer, he has recorded numerous Gold, Platinum, and Grammy winning records. Toby’s research interests include audio preservation practices... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
Theatre 1

9:30am

Keynote: AI for sound: A future technology for sound archives
Imagine you are standing on a street corner in a city. Close your eyes: what do you hear? Perhaps some cars and busses driving on the road, footsteps of people on the pavement, beeps from a pedestrian crossing, rustling and clonks from shopping bags and boxes, and the hubbub of talking shoppers. You can do the same in a kitchen as someone is making breakfast, or as you are travelling in a vehicle. Now, following the success of AI and machine learning technologies for speech and image recognition, we are beginning to build computer systems to tackle this challenging task: to automatically recognize real-world sound scenes and events. In this talk, we will explore some of the work going on in this rapidly expanding research area, and touch on some of the key issues for the future, including ensuring privacy around sound sensors. We will discuss some of the potential applications emerging for sound recognition, from home security and assisted living to exploring sound archives. We will close with some pointers to more information about this exciting future technology.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Mark Plumbley

Professor Mark Plumbley

Professor of Signal Processing, University of Surrey, UK
Mark Plumbley is Professor of Signal Processing at the Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing (CVSSP) at the University of Surrey, in Guildford, UK. He is an expert on analysis and processing of audio and music, using a wide range of signal processing and machine learning... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 9:30am - 10:30am
Theatre 1

10:30am

Refreshments
Monday September 30, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Atrium

11:00am

Discography committee open meeting
Speakers
avatar for Filip Šír

Filip Šír

Sound Documents Manager, National Museum, Czech Republic, Prague
Filip Šír, DiS. is the coordinator for digitization of audio documents in the Digitization and New Media Department of the National Museum. Since 2012, he has been focusing on a comprehensive solution for the issue of audio documents, from the principles of sound document care to... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
BenGLab 1

11:00am

Technical committee open meeting
Speakers
avatar for Lars Gaustad

Lars Gaustad

Head of moving image preservation, National Library of Norway
Lars Gaustad is head of moving image preservation at the National Library of Norway. The library holds the heritage collection of moving images in Norway as well as being responsible for handling the legal deposit of film and television. He has chaired the Technical Commission of... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Theatre 2

11:00am

Audiovisual archives - for inspiration, for creativity
How can producers of films, radio broadcasts, music recordings ensure their creations are best preserved for the future? And could audiovisual archives be better used by the creative industries around the world to create new cultural products? There are numerous examples of productions using archival footage, from Peter Jackson's 2018 documentary film "They Shall Not Grow Old", to radio stations entirely composed of archived programmes. Can the best examples inspire and inform archivists how to grow and manage and provide access to the collections that they safeguard? Can the production sector collaborate more closely with archives to ensure a more efficient and comprehensive preservation of cultural heritage? This panel will be introduced by members of the Audiovisual Think Tank, a forum established in January 2018 by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision to examine the key policies and strategic priorities for audiovisual archives of the future. It will be followed by case studies of successes of collaborations between archives and creators. The panel will end with a short Q&A with the audience on how archives/creators can cooperate successfully.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Ranft

Richard Ranft

British Library
Richard Ranft is Head of Sound & Vision at the British Library, with responsibility for 7 million sound recordings, 280,000 moving image items and 750m newspaper pages, and for bringing them together in digital form to create new services for users of the collections. He currently... Read More →
avatar for Giovanna Fossati

Giovanna Fossati

Chief Curator / Professor, EYE Filmmuseum / University of Amsterdam
Giovanna Fossati is Professor of Film Heritage and Digital Film Culture at the University of Amsterdam where she has taught in the MA Preservation and Presentation of the Moving Image Program since it was established, in 2003. She is also the Chief Curator at EYE Filmmuseum (Amsterdam... Read More →
avatar for Judith Opoku-Boateng

Judith Opoku-Boateng

Archivist, Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana
Judith Opoku-Boateng is the Head Archivist of the J. H. Kwabena Nketia Archives of the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, West Africa. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology and a Master’s Degree in Archival Studies from the University of Ghana. Judith started... Read More →
avatar for Johan Oomen

Johan Oomen

Head of Research and Development, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
I'm head of the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision R&D Department and researcher at the Web and Media group of the VU University Amsterdam. I'm an elected board member of the Europeana Association, of the EUscreen Foundation and of CLICKNL, the innovation catalyst for the... Read More →
avatar for Leenke Ripmeester

Leenke Ripmeester

Sales Manager, EYE Filmuseum
Leenke Ripmeester is the sales manager of the film collection of Eye Filmmuseum (Amsterdam, the Netherlands) since 2013. She delivers archival footage, including the large WWI collection of Eye, to television channels, museums, and other companies from all over the world. She is also... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Theatre 1

11:00am

Poster session 1
11:00am - 11:30am

Stand 1

The future life of past conversations - making historical interviews available for scientific research
Johannes Kapeller

Stand 2

A Gift from Afar: A "Global South" Manifesto
Pedro Félix

11:30am - 12:00pm

Stand 1

Recovering a set of ethnographic music recordings of Mozambique
Susana Belchior and Isaac Raimundo

Stand 2

Audiovisual preservation at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation and open access to scientific and technological knowledge in health
João Guilherme Machado

12:00pm - 12:30pm

Stand 1

School of Music Audio Recordings at the University of Illinois: A Case Study of Audio Preservation Workflow
Miyuki Meyer and Cristina Kühn




Speakers
avatar for Cristina Kühn

Cristina Kühn

Media Preservation & Digital Reformatting Project Manager, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Born and raised in Miami, Cristina's work always revolved around local libraries, museums and special collections. But it was a rare job as an archivist at the Lynn and Louis Wolfson II Florida Moving Image Archive of Miami Dade College that officially introduced her to the world... Read More →
avatar for Johannes Kapeller

Johannes Kapeller

Media Archivist, Österreichische Mediathek
Johannes Kapeller is media archivist at the Österreichische Mediathek since 2003. He studied Cultural Anthropology and Communication science at the University of Vienna. His main work areas are Public Relations, Project Management, Visitor Care and Cooperations. Since 2016 he is... Read More →
avatar for Pedro Félix

Pedro Félix

integrated researcher, Instituto de Etnomusicologia / FCSH-UNL
Pedro Félix is a researcher at INET-MD since 1997, at Instituto de História Contemporânea since 2013, and collaborates with the Fado Museum since 2005. He has developed fieldwork on musical groups in Portugal, technology, phonographic publishing industry, sound heritage. This work... Read More →
avatar for Miyuki Meyer

Miyuki Meyer

Audio and Video Specialist, University of California, San Diego
Miyuki Meyer is the Audio and Video Specialist at the UC San Diego Library. She has previously worked in the Media Preservation Unit at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Libraries as a graduate assistant and interned at the 'Ulu'ulu Moving Image Archive of Hawai'i. In... Read More →
avatar for Susana Belchior

Susana Belchior

PhD Fellow in Conservation & Restoration, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa
I am a PhD fellow in Conservation and Restoration at the Associated Laboratory Requimte and DCR - Department of Conservation & Restoration (FCT/Universidade NOVA de Lisboa), and INET-MD/Instituto de Etnomusicologia - Centro de Estudos em Música e Dança (FCSH/Universidade NOVA de... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
Atrium

12:00pm

Assessing video standards for endangered languages archives
Around the turn of the 21st century, as numerous digital language archives dedicated to the documentation of endangered languages were established, best practices for the creation and archiving of audio recordings, annotation, and metadata were established and widely accepted (see for example the Open Language Archive Community; http://www.language-archives.org/). At that time, some initial best practice recommendations for video recording were also established, but the use of video for documenting spoken language was still considered to be beyond the reach of all but the most well-funded documentary projects, and few documentary linguistics worked with the medium and even fewer understood the best practices in place. However, over the last decade, there has been a sharp increase in the use of video in language documentation projects, but there are still no widely accepted best practices in the field, neither by archivists who curate endangered language archives nor by the documenters who are producing and processing the video files for archives. This paper presents some of the challenges documentary linguists and endangered language archives face in adopting appropriate video file formats, such as the limited resources for storing and processing large, high-quality video files (e.g., JPEG 2000), and provides some recommendations for establishing best practices for the use of video in the field of documentary linguistics.

Speakers
avatar for Leah Pappas

Leah Pappas

University of Hawaii at Manoa
I am a Ph.D student with interests in community-based language documentation and description, video documentation, and the intersection of space/environment, language, and culture.
avatar for Bradley McDonnell

Bradley McDonnell

Assistant Professor, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa


Monday September 30, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Theatre 2

12:00pm

Ethnic piano rolls
The beginning of twentieth century was a golden age of a player pianos and piano rolls in US. Up till the great depression in 1933 there were issued billions of piano rolls of classical, popular, folk and dance music. A significant part of these rolls were issued only for a usagege of various ethnic US groups of immigrants. Titled as "foreighn" rolls (QRS) they played an important role in socio-cultural life of ethnic communities of that time and made an influence to a formation of a popular music in US. Unfortunately these rolls were forgotten and left outside of academic/musicological discussions up to the present time because of music researchers' attention only to the piano rolls of world-famous pianists and composers. Though fragmented research has been done by some music historians and ethnomusicologists (Roehl, 1961; Greene, 1992; Berkman, 2006; Weill, 2011; Kučinskas, 2014), US ethnic piano rolls are still "terra incognito" for a larger society of researchers, collectioneers and sound recording engineers. Main historical, sociological, technological and musicological aspects will be discussed with a demonstration of rare and unique sound recordings made in last years during the research on US ethnic piano rolls.

Speakers
avatar for Darius Kucinskas

Darius Kucinskas

Professor, Kaunas University of Technology
I am interested in and doing research on early music recordings, especially ethnic piano rolls.


Monday September 30, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
BenGLab 1

12:00pm

The role of audiovisual archives in music heritage sustainability: Conditions for accessibility and reuse
Digital technology has made historic recordings of music heritage held in AV archives increasingly accessible to the world at large. With this increase in accessibility has come an increase in reuse of the recordings for compilations available for purchase and for community interventions that promote use of the recordings that involves sampling and remix into compositions that appeal to contemporary youth. Do such projects promote music heritage sustainability or undermine it? Do source communities of the historic recordings have any rights over the use of their heritage in this way? This paper discusses these and related issues in an effort to determine if there is a need for AV archives to develop standards that establish conditions for accessibility and reuse of their holdings designed to deal with contingencies of 21st century realities and implications of the open access paradigm.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Thram

Diane Thram

Professor Emeritus, International Library of African Music, Rhodes University
I was Director of ILAM for 10 years and became passionate about music heritage archives, digital return of field collections to their communities of origin, issues in archival ethics and the need to de-colonize collections through heritage activism and promotion of music sustain... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Theatre 1

12:30pm

Lunch
Monday September 30, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Atrium

1:30pm

IIIF for AV: The International Image Interoperability Framework is no longer just for images
Over the last three years, the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) Community has been working to extend the IIIF APIs to support AV. The IIIF Presentation 3 API has been driven by the needs of collections who already use IIIF and wish to extend the same interoperability features to their audiovisual collections, as well as new use cases from the wider AV community. The AV Technical Specification Group within IIIF, of which Tom Crane is co-chair, has been gathering use cases, modelling complex AV archival material, building implementations and refining the model. The IIIF Presentation API version 3 is the result. This paper introduces the API, and shows how the integration of textual and other annotation content, so powerful for image-based media, now works for time-based media too. Examples of IIIF for AV in action will demonstrate the capabilities of IIIF for AV collections.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Crane

Tom Crane

Technology Director, Digirati
Technology Director, DigiratiOne of the editors of the IIIF specificationsCo-Chair of IIIF AV Technical Specification Group


Monday September 30, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
BenGLab 2

1:30pm

Media preservation and digitization principles and practices
This session presents principles and practices for both media preservation programs and media digitization operations. Emerging from the work of the Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative at Indiana University and its planning forerunner known as the Media Preservation Initiative, these principles have contributed to the development of workflows and program-level decisions at IU. This work is closely connected to IASA-TC 03, although this set makes the principles more explicit, explores issues at both the program and digitization levels, and digs deeper in some areas by addressing specific details of digitization. A principle may be defined as a fundamental or general truth, concept or value that is a guide for behavior or evaluation. Principles govern the development of specific policies or practices employed within the space that they represent. This presentation will feature real world examples to illustrate how principles and practices may be applied within a preservation program or a digitization operation, whether attached to an institution or part of the services offered by a vendor.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Casey

Mike Casey

Mike Casey is the Director of Technical Operations for audio and video for Indiana University’s Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative, which has digitally preserved more than 310,000 audio and video recordings to date. He is the co-author of Sound Directions: Best Practices... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Theatre 2

1:30pm

Diversity task force open meeting
Speakers
avatar for Judith Opoku-Boateng

Judith Opoku-Boateng

Archivist, Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana
Judith Opoku-Boateng is the Head Archivist of the J. H. Kwabena Nketia Archives of the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, West Africa. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology and a Master’s Degree in Archival Studies from the University of Ghana. Judith started... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
BenGLab 1

1:30pm

W1: The safeguarding of the audiovisual heritage: Ethics, principles and preservation strategy (IASA-TC 03)
Co-edited by Will Prentice and Lars Gaustad, this is the 4th Edition, published in 2017. While the earlier versions concentrated on audio, this new edition is extending these general principles and strategies to include moving images. The tutorial concentrates on the content migration for audio and video documents, the only viable method to preserve their contents in the long-term, because of the instability of original carriers and the obsolescence of replay equipment. The principles of optimal signal extraction from original carriers, unmodified transfer to digital archival formats, and the importance of metadata for the authentication of contents will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Dietrich Schüller

Dietrich Schüller

consultant, Phonogrammarchiv, Austrian Academy of Sciences
Dietrich Schüller, retired director of and now consultant to the Vienna Phonogrammarchiv, has been with IASA since 1972. Starting out as cultural anthropologist – his PhD is in African History – he became increasingly involved in technical matters related to audiovisual archiving... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Theatre 1

2:00pm

South African memory: After the Rivonia Trial, new steps, new challenges
The purpose of the presentation will be focused this year on the collaboration between NARSSA (South Africa) and INA (France). We continue to work together on historical heritage of South African trials on dictabelts. It will be about mutual benefits.

Speakers
avatar for Nkwenkwezi Languza

Nkwenkwezi Languza

Head of the Sound Preservation Section, National Archives of South Africa
I am the Head of the Sound Preservation Section of the National Film, Video and Sound Archives (NFVSA), a sub-directorate of the National Archives and Records Service of South Africa (NARSSA) in the Department of Arts and Culture. I worked for etv as a Sound Engineer, in 2008 I was... Read More →
avatar for Vincent Fromont

Vincent Fromont

Audio Restoration Specialist, Ina
Vincent Fromont coordinates the preservation and restoration activities on the radiophonic collection at INA since 1998. After working as a professional musician and in audiovisual production, he joined INA in 1993 as a radio technician and thus achieved a childhood dream of working... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
BenGLab 2

2:00pm

Systematic in-house digitization of legacy media archives: Case study of industrial digitization facilities
Worldwide, the threat of “degralescence” - a menacing combination of degradation and obsolescence - is pushing institutions holding legacy media archives towards a hazy yet inevitable deadline for a decision on how to safeguard their valuable assets for future generations. For quite a while now, high quality digitization of carrier-based media has been the key to achieve this goal. Approaching the endeavor of digitizing an entire archive, institutions meet challenges like the choice of right equipment, allocation of personnel and its training, methods of handling problematic carriers or financing of the project, among others. A seemingly overwhelming task – but is it, really? The presenter aims to shed a spotlight on a selection of successful inhouse digitization facilities all around the globe; and specifically, on how the application of principles of industrial manufacturing processes enabled them to increase efficiency of their projects concerning cost as well as production output.

Speakers
avatar for Manuel Corn

Manuel Corn

After graduating from the University of Applied Sciences in St. Pölten, Austria, as an engineer in media production, Manuel worked in this industry for several years before extending his academic portfolio with an MBA in General Management. Since 2015, Manuel is working for NOA Archive... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Theatre 2

2:30pm

From Digital to Analogue: the Challenges and Prospects of Data Capturing and Preservation in an African Archive
Over the past 50 years, the nature of audio and video recording and its documentation has evolved, influencing the manner in which cultural and other artistic expressions are shared for education and entertainment purposes. Media formats have undergone radical changes during this period aided by the wave of technological innovation(s). The digital revolution has brought about new audio-visual formats for archiving. This has caused institutional archives worldwide to make a transition from preserving audio-visual collections on tapes to creating digital files.  One such international archives, the J. H. Kwabena Nketia archives at the Institute of African Studies at the University of Ghana, is currently bracing the opportunities and challenges offered by emerging innovations in archiving. In this paper, we will discuss some of the problems, advantages and potential solutions of migrating from analogue formats of data storage to modern digital solutions. This presentation would be made within the framework of the current needs of African archives, taking into consideration budget, connectivity issues, technical capability of staff, available equipment and long-term preservation needs. This talk will draw from the digitization experiences at the J.H. Kwame Nketia Archives at the Institute of African Studies as well as a startup community archives in Chicago -- the Lithuanian Archives Project (LAP). It is our hope that this presentation will generate a dispassionate discussion on the above issues relevant to archives that are facing similar challenges in the developing world.

Speakers
avatar for Nathaniel Kpogo Worlanyo

Nathaniel Kpogo Worlanyo

Senior Research Assistant, J. H. Kwabena Nketia Archives Institute of African Studies University of Ghana, Legon
I am Kpogo Worlanyo Nathaniel Kwaku and a Senior Research Assistant at the J.H Kwabena Nekita Archives, Institute of African Studies,Legon. I am a Bachelor of Art degree holder in Geography and Archeology.I have been a sound engineer since 2004 to date. During this period I have recorded... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
BenGLab 2

2:30pm

Preserving the legacy of Odɛɛfoɔ Owusu Amoayɛ II
This paper explores the historical background and collectibles of a passed chief called Odɛɛfoɔ Owusu Amoayɛ II in Ashanti Region, Ghana. Arguably, the longest serving chief of Asanteman (Ashanti Region) in Ghana who reigned for sixty-eight (68) years. An in-depth interview was conducted with his sub chiefs, family members, close friends and other local informants to give a historical background of the Chief, as well as interpreting photographs and audiovisuals found in the palace.This Chief’s palace holds photographs and other audiovisual materials that are decaying. Proper and immediate methods of restoration and preservation were conducted to bring life into these materials. The oral history interview that was conducted, along with contents of the photographs and audiovisual materials hold great historical value to the people in the Chief’s community and seek to serve as educational material. This project is still in the process of acquiring and preserving historical collections related to Odɛɛfoɔ Owusu Amoayɛ II. Preliminary action suggests that the indigenous people in the community are willing to learn proper ways of preserving historical valuable materials and deposit it in various archives institutions.

Speakers
avatar for George Gyesaw

George Gyesaw

Senior Research Assistant, Institute of African Studies
George assist students, lectures and the public in their research works in relation to to African Studies at University of Ghana.He manages the J. H. Kwabena Archives audiovisual finding aid and serves as a consultant to Ghana Broadcasting Corporation Film and Video Library and Ghana... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
BenGLab 1

2:30pm

The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision audio digitization system: A case study
The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision (Beeld en Geluid) in Hilversum is one of the largest audio-visual archives in Europe. The largest part of this aural heritage consists of analog quarter-inch tapes, R-DAT cassettes and records. As part of the public contract Images for the Future, Sound and Vision has transferred more than 100.000 hours of Dutch broadcast audio from various legacy carrier to mass storage systems. QUADRIGA and Cube-Workflow systems from Cube-Tec have been used since 2009 to secure the media quality in the migration process. In addition, the annual ingest targets could be exceeded. The system has been recently updated to optimize the transfer of R-DATs, shellacs and vinyl records. This presentation will give insight into the project from different perspectives and illustrate how this large-scale digitization project could be finished within the targeted time frame and calculated budget. Various aspects of the project will be discussed, starting with the decision to use technical observation methods to enable parallel ingest, special challenges while working with R-DATs and experience how QC tools can support the digitization of records. The presentation will be jointly held by a representative from the collection forming department at Sound and Vision, describing the task from the user's point of view, and by a representative of the manufacturer of the system, explaining the technical layout of the selected solution.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Lorenz

Tom Lorenz

Managing Director, Cube-Tec International
Tom Lorenz studied sound engineering in Berlin from 1987 to 1993. After receiving his degree as Diplom-Tonmeister he worked as support engineer for an audio restoration system. From 1995 to 2002 he was employed as a project engineer for international sound and radio studio installations... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Theatre 2

3:00pm

Refreshments
Monday September 30, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Atrium

3:30pm

IASA In video
At 50 years it is a time for reflection. A time to look back. While I can't take you back in Conference video the full 50 years, I can bring us back as far as 31 years, to 1988 in Vienna, IASA's first solo Conference. Thereafter we can be whisked through 13 more, from Ottawa, Sopron, Canberra, Helsinki, Bogensee, Washington (twice), Vienna again, Singapore, London, Philadelphia, Paris and Berlin. They will have to be brief visits, of course, but it should bring back memories, and a glance at yourself perhaps, and IASA friends. Including Dietrich, of course.

Speakers

Monday September 30, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Theatre 1

4:00pm

General assembly
Speakers
avatar for Toby Seay

Toby Seay

Professor, Music Industry, Drexel University
Toby Seay is Professor of Music Production and Chair of the Department of Arts & Entertainment Enterprise at Drexel University. As an audio engineer, he has recorded numerous Gold, Platinum, and Grammy winning records. Toby’s research interests include audio preservation practices... Read More →


Monday September 30, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Theatre 1

6:00pm

Welcoming reception
Free to registered delegates; advance booking required during registration.
The opening reception will take place at the atrium of the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision. Drinks and snacks will be provided.
During the reception there will be short speeches and live music performances, while composer and phonographer Aleks Kolkowski will recreate the historic acoustic recording process on wax cylinders using an original Edison phonograph.

Alex Kolkowski recording onto a phonograph (photo by Helen Petts)


Monday September 30, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Atrium
 
Tuesday, October 1
 

8:30am

9:00am

Organizing knowledge committee open meeting
Speakers
avatar for Johan Oomen

Johan Oomen

Head of Research and Development, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
I'm head of the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision R&D Department and researcher at the Web and Media group of the VU University Amsterdam. I'm an elected board member of the Europeana Association, of the EUscreen Foundation and of CLICKNL, the innovation catalyst for the... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
Theatre 2

9:00am

Modern high-quality transfer approaches to wire and magnetic belt formats
The archival transfer of the tape, disc, and cylinder formats currently benefits from a high level of equipment sophistication and an impressive community knowledge base that has been building for decades. In contrast, a few legacy audio formats with important archival content such as wire and Magnabelts are typically still being transferred with original 40- to 70-year-old equipment and with fairly limited understanding of the core format problems. Along with damage to the media itself, the vintage machine approach typically results in audio with significant rumble, flutter, speed errors, distortion, hum, and other noise issues. Recent developments in high-quality equipment provide the opportunity to significantly reduce or eliminate these problems, as well as allow the transfer of deteriorated media that cannot be handled on vintage machines. The results can help elevate this media from just a means for written-transcription towards actual audio uses such as film or radio content. This presentation will discuss the modern high-quality playback of wire and magnetic belt, and compare the results to the vintage machines used almost universally today. Several larger transfers projects with these formats will also be discussed to highlight some of the unique workflow and storage issues.

Speakers
avatar for Nicholas Bergh

Nicholas Bergh

Founder, Endpoint Audio Labs, Inc.
Nicholas Bergh received his B.A. and M.A. in ethnomusicology from UCLA where he specialized in the history of recording technology and sound archiving. During this time, he was also fortunate to be mentored by engineers who worked in the earliest decades of optical sound, disc, and... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
Theatre 1

9:00am

The International Library of African Music (ILAM) and its relationship with a decolonial imaginary in present day South Africa
In the past few years the demands for a decolonised approach to the development and archiving of knowledge has occupied the minds and rhetoric of scholars through students through consumers of everyday goods. This demand coincides with the widespread criticisms of ILAM and its founder, Hugh Tracey, who is charged with being complicit with the undertakings of colonialism and later, apartheid. While these criticisms have value, they fail to recognise other aspects to Hugh Tracey’s work and they fail to offer an alternative means of moving forward. In this paper I argue that a different approach to the HT holdings, among the many other collections, offers a solution to the question of how the archive could become more relevant to its context. In this context the prerogatives for ILAM are clear. ILAM is situated in one of the least developed provinces of South Africa. The question was in how ILAM was going to reimagine ideas of the archive, knowledge, access and music. How could a music archive be relevant to the context within which it finds itself, particularly if that context is riddled with the legacy of racial and class oppression, and the elitism attached to the ideas of 'knowledge' and the practice of music? What would be the most ethical model of a music archive in this context? In this presentation, I discuss the various attempts, from digital return to community participation, currently unfolding at ILAM. Through practice and rhetoric and critical reflection, I conclude that ILAM is produced as a site with radical possibilities for the music archive.

Speakers
avatar for Lee Watkins

Lee Watkins

Director of the International Library of African Music, Rhodes University, South Africa
Lee Watkins has been the Director of the International Library of African Music in South Africa since 2016. Before then he served as a senior lecturer in Ethnomusicology and as Head of Department in the Department of Music at Rhodes University. His interests include the applied studies... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
BenGLab 1

9:00am

The Lucy Durán collection: A report into the technical challenges digitising a mixed format audio collection
A primary aim of the British Library's ambitious Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project is to digitise 110,000 items from our archival sound recording collections; many of these present unique challenges and technical hurdles, particularly those recorded over many years and multiple formats. The C2: Lucy Durán collection was created over a period of two decades, focusing primarily on field recordings in Gambia. The collection consists of 420 items, recorded across 5 different audio formats; from quarter-inch analogue tape, through to cassette, before transitioning into digital recording technology, primarily Digital Audio Tape (DAT). As an engineer working on the collection this paper will provide a technical breakdown for actively preserving such a diverse collection to archival standards; describing the methodology, configuration of equipment and the technical challenges that had to be overcome, including the extraction of sub-code information from DAT and accessing content on the obscure NT "Scoopman" format. The collection has now been digitised and the recordings are currently being catalogued for discovery and access. As part of the numerable collections that will make up the Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project, these recordings will provide an invaluable tool for researchers into Gambian music.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Ruane

Tom Ruane

Preservation Audio Engineer / Trainer, British Library
Tom Ruane is a Preservation Audio Engineer & Trainer at the British Library, with over 10 years experience in the audio preservation field. In his current role on the ambitious Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project, which aims to digitise and fully preserve 160,00 at-risk recordings... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
BenGLab 2

9:30am

AV as historical documents: Audiovisual materials about the Philippines under Marcos
Audiovisual materials may serve as historical documents (Lavender, 1997). Given the "intense contestation over the memory" (Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints, 2016) and the "disputed" stage of Philippine history related to the Marcos dictatorship (Roque, Deloria, & Buenrostro, 2017), the role of AV archives, whether local or abroad, is important for truth-seeking, most pressing in light of the massive disinformation and historical revisionist manoeuvrings in the country. Locally, a large part of the audiovisual collections covering the Philippines under Marcos is in the Philippine Film Archive (PFA). These AV materials in the PFA film vaults are mainly produced by the Marcos-era National Media Production Center (NMPC). But it is not just in the Philippines that these important AV materials are found. In one of the largest audiovisual archives in Europe and in the world, the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, an initial search in its online browser will yield more than 2,500 results related to the Philippines and more than 10% of these are pertaining to the Philippines under Marcos (www.beeldengeluid.nl, 2018). An interesting find is the 44-minute TV documentary by André Truyman titled "Thrilla in Manilla: De Filipijnen onder staat van beleg" broadcasted by KRO on 1 May 1976, less than four years after Marcos declared Martial Law in the Philippines. This is just one of the many AV materials in the Sound and Vision that delve on the past but speak much of the future: An action agenda (AV Think Tank, 2018) in our quest for social justice.

Speakers
avatar for Rosemarie Roque

Rosemarie Roque

Assistant Professor IV, Department of Filipinology, Polytechnic University of the Philippines
Rosemarie O. Roque is currently the only IASA associate member from the Philippines. She is also an associate individual member of the South-East Asia Pacific Audio-Visual Archives Association (SEAPAVAA). She is also a member of the Cinema and Moving Image Research Assembly (CAMIRA... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am
BenGLab 1

9:30am

Higher than 96KHz: A case for magnetic tape
Established as a digitization preservation standard, 96KHz sample rate is the target sample rate for most archival endeavors. IASA TC-04 states: “IASA recommends 96 kHz as a higher sampling rate, though this is intended only as a guide, not an upper limit; however, for most general audio materials the sampling rates described should be adequate.” NARAS, which points to IASA TC-04 for guidance, now lists 96KHz as a minimum sample rate and 192KHz as the ideal sample rate. Therefore, the archival community is seeing a movement towards higher sample rates. But what are the specific benefits as it relates to magnetic tape? This paper looks at magnetic tape content and provides numerous cases where higher-than-96KHz digital preservation should be considered. While this topic will not be controversial within the technical community, those making institutional workflow policies might want to consider total content preservation, perceptual aesthetics, and affordances for potential for secondary use post-processing.

Speakers
avatar for Toby Seay

Toby Seay

Professor, Music Industry, Drexel University
Toby Seay is Professor of Music Production and Chair of the Department of Arts & Entertainment Enterprise at Drexel University. As an audio engineer, he has recorded numerous Gold, Platinum, and Grammy winning records. Toby’s research interests include audio preservation practices... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am
Theatre 1

9:30am

Scotland’s Sounds: Fostering creativity in our archives
The challenges and opportunities that archival audio create are well known and understood within this conference. In Scotland, to address these issues we have established a professional network, Scotland’s Sounds, for all organisations and individuals with a stake in looking after and providing access to our heritage on audio formats. Through collaborative exchanges including, projects, knowledge exchange and training, public engagement activities and sharing skills and equipment we have managed to make a valuable impact on sound archives in the sector beyond the usual institutions that work with sound.
One of the challenges that Scotland’s Sounds have set ourselves is to do more to foster public engagement and creative re-use of the archive material, not just by providing access to the material but by facilitating projects and engaging new audiences to inspire creativity. As well as introducing the work of the network I will present a few examples and case studies of some of the work that we have undertaken in the network through projects, including for example running animation workshops around oral histories with children and community groups, and supporting artist-in-residence schemes to use the archive in their creative practice. In Scotland the field of ethnology is being revived around the wave of “Creative Ethnology”, resulting in ethnological practice manifesting in creative practice of, for example, new music, theatre or writing, inspired by fieldwork. I would suggest that similarly archives of the future will move beyond the preservation/access paradigm to become more active, rather than passive, in the creative re-use of its collections.

Speakers
avatar for Alistair Bell

Alistair Bell

Sound Collections Curator, National Library of Scotland
Sound Collections Curator at National Library of Scotland, leading various projects to improve care of access to Scotland's sound heritage. This includes leading on the development of the Scotland's Sounds network, a network of over 100 organisations looking after sound collections... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am
BenGLab 2

9:30am

W2: RDA and audiovisual archives
RDA (Resource Description and Access) is a cataloging standard that was first published in 2010. RDA was designed on the one hand to be compatible with the legacy of preceding cataloging rules (AACR2 - Anglo American Cataloging Rules), and on the other hand to better respond to new challenges, mainly coming from the digital world. Since its publication, RDA has been adopted by an increasing number of cultural organisations, mainly libraries. What about audiovisual archives? Is RDA used at all? Can RDA be considered a suitable standard for audiovisual archives? Are any changes required for RDA to become more suitable? If so, which ones? By first presenting and explaining RDA’s structure, its evolution, and the conceptual models that inform it, this tutorial will try to answer these questions. Particular attention will be paid to RDA’s current capacity to respond to the needs of audiovisual archives.

Speakers
avatar for Nadia Lai

Nadia Lai

Head of cataloguing and training, Swiss National Sound Archives
I have a degree in English Literature and Science of Religions (University of Fribourg - Switzerland) and a post-graduate certificate in Information and Documentation Science (School of Business Administration of Geneva and University of Geneva). I have mainly worked in libraries... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 9:30am - 10:30am
Theatre 2

10:00am

Digital transformation at audiovisual archives: becoming digital by design
The NFSA has embraced digital – building collections and enabling access to them for use and re-use and integrating digital experiences in our events and exhibitions. Digital Transformation at the NFSA is not so much about transformation from analogue to digital; rather, it is about evolution from a first generation, hybrid analogue/digital film and sound archive to an archive that is digital by design. ‘Analogue’ and ‘digital’ are not mutually exclusive or opposing forces. The NFSA’s physical collections, the onsite and online exhibitions, programs, events and even the building are an integral part of the digitalisation of the NFSA.
An archive that is ‘digital by design’ means that our intention is to think, act and be digital first – for digital experiences to be intrinsically part of the life of the archive and the people who learn, experience and create with us.
In this presentation, I will highlight the principles of becoming an archive that is digital by design and the steps that the NFSA is taking in order to make Digital Transformation happen. Attention in this presentation also for the serious focus on People and Culture and the structure of the organisation. One of the focus points will also be how to collaborate: Digital Transformation should happen through close collaboration with partner institutions and other umbrella organisations, e.g. when it comes to the preservation of new media and multimedia.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Müller

Jan Müller

CEO, National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA)
Jan Müller (1967) is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA). Mr Müller is also a Member of the Advisory Board of the Centre for Media History at Macquarie University, Sydney.Jan Müller is a highly experienced CEO and leader... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
Theatre 1

10:00am

From a ‘Culture of Silence’ to a free press: What oral histories tell us about self-censorship, ethics, and journalism in Ghana
Graduate students from the University of Ghana’s Department of Communication Studies are working on a project to record the oral histories of journalists who were present and working during the transition in Ghana to a democratic republic in 1992. Prior to that, from 1982 to 1992, the media operated under a military regime whose threats created a “culture of silence.” To be an honest journalist was dangerous because of the newspaper licensing law, which discouraged the establishment of private media and press freedom. The 1992 Constitution ended more than a decade of military dictatorship promulgating greater media freedom. And in July 2001, parliament unanimously repealed The Criminal Libel Law. The Media Foundation for West Africa said the law was “inimical” to freedom of the press.
Twenty-nine oral histories are currently part of the university’s Institute of African Studies, J.H. Kwabena Nketia Archives. Students from the 2019 graduate class are currently working on additional oral histories and the plan is to continue this project for many years, not only compiling oral histories from journalists who worked during the transition to a free press but expanding the collection to trace the evolution of journalism in Ghana until the present day. An archived oral history may also serve to remind the public that if journalists take advantage of their freedoms to push specific policies and political agendas, a country can fall into chaos and civil war. The 1994 massacre in Rwanda is a prime example of using radio to incite genocide.

Speakers
avatar for Ivy Fofie

Ivy Fofie

Assistant Lecturer, University of Ghana
Ivy M. Fofie is an Assistant Lecturer at the Department of Communication Studies, University of Ghana. He expertise is in Journalism, gender and communication and media ethics and law. She is currently a trainer for DW Akademie on Media and Information Literacy on a need to basis... Read More →
avatar for Alice Daniel

Alice Daniel

News Director, KVPR Valley Public Radio
Alice Daniel taught in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Ghana as a U.S. Fulbright Scholar in 2017-18. As a lecturer at California State University, Fresno, she helped start the Central Valley War Veterans Oral History Project. That project inspired her... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
BenGLab 1

10:00am

National aggregator for sound in the Czech Republic
We have reported on the situation of Czech Audio in the international field many times. We have given presentations relating to this topic regularly across the last four years at IASA conferences. We gave talks about the history of sound in our country, from the beginning through to an environment where we have begun to see rising interest in it, as well as about our volunteer work, about surveys we have carried out, about the problems with educating our younger generation and about some of our successes as well. We would like to introduce our biggest and the most visible achievement - the national Czech sound aggregator - in this year’s presentation. The portal, called the Virtual National Phonotheque, was already briefly mentioned in presentations abroad, but now it is time to present it in more detail. We will introduce the content and services, as well as our plans for it, both in regards to the technological solution and the content. VNF is not only a traditional library union catalogue. It brings added value and begins to fulfill other important functionalities, such as linking recordings to other repositories while allowing access to them from anywhere, restructuring metadata to suit environments other than a traditional library catalogue, and involving the public in the design and implementation of the portal and its enrichment. It is a solution which could be of interest and inspiration for other countries who are faced with reviving old technology to meet new demands, as present in audiovisual media.

Speakers
avatar for Iva Horová

Iva Horová

Virtual National Phonoteque - coordinator, National Library of Technology
I am graduated in piano playing, musicology and librarienship.Main topics of my interests are music librarianship, methodology of describing special types of documents, data conversation, methodology of document digitization and preservation. I was director of the Library of Academy... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
BenGLab 2

10:30am

11:00am

Archiving Austin City Limits: Applying software development methodologies to audiovisual archiving
Software development and audiovisual archiving are surprisingly similar in many ways. Specifications, file naming, hierarchies, relational materials, metadata, data management, discoverability, storage, use cases, strict standards, best practices and 3rd party requirements are applicable to both fields and can be applied quite similarly in a lot of cases. Correspondingly, project management between the two fields isn’t vastly different. The discussion will cover how these two fields intersect, what methods can be shared and how software project management tools, such as Agile, can be applied successfully in tracking and managing an audiovisual archive project from kick off to completion.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Moore

Amanda Moore

Technical Project Director, ACL Archive, KLRU-TV PBS Austin
Amanda Moore is the Technical Project Director for the Austin City Limits Archive Project. Her role is to ensure the audiovisual collection is preserved at the highest level of quality possible. She’s in charge of planning, scheduling and execution of every aspect of digitization... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Theatre 1

11:00am

The return of Malawian intangible cultural heritage: Tales given form for the next generation
Folktales are a valuable and rich traditional culture of Malawians, central to customs and beliefs of people of Malawi. Unfortunately, there have not been any concerted efforts in the country to preserve these verbal arts traditions. Arts and cultural institutions entrusted with preservation of our traditions ignore verbal arts. The work of preservation is left to a few scholars and concerned individuals. However, these efforts rarely reach the larger public. They tend to end up as treaties and one-off publications, or in private manuscripts that gather dust or mould somewhere. This oral tradition is all but vanishing in recent years due to aging of community figures who can deliver live performances as well as changes in lifestyle. And because Malawi has made little effort to preserve the tradition, the unique culture of its ethnic groups is on the verge of extinction. Corporation, at the request of Malawi National Commission for UNESCO, GFCT/Rei Foundation and SONY, provided financial support, audiovisual recording equipment and technical training to preserve the Malawian cultural heritage before it disappears. This paper addresses the safari taken from 2012-2015 to identify people who can still narrate folktales in all 28 districts of the country; the phases done to document them as video and audio outputs; and analysis of their metadata. The document also addresses data standardisation from 2016-2018; creation of a repository for preservation and dissemination of folktales in 2019 and the impact made at national and international level since the initial stages of folktales project implementation.

Speakers
avatar for Chimwemwe Sumani

Chimwemwe Sumani

Information Technology Specialist, Malawi National Library Service
Chimwemwe Sumani is an Information Technology Specialist and a Head of ICT, Audiovisual and Culture Departments for Malawi National Library Service (MNLS) since September, 2009. She has been a trainer and technical personnel for all Malawi National Commission for UNESCO’s Audiovisual... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
BenGLab 2

11:00am

Research archives section open meeting
Speakers
avatar for Aaron Bittel

Aaron Bittel

Director of World Music Archives and Music Librarian, Wesleyan University
Aaron M. Bittel is Director of the World Music Archives and Music Librarian at Wesleyan University. He previously served as Archivist-Librarian and Head of Digital Projects for the UCLA Ethnomusicology Archive, one of the largest and oldest ethnographic audiovisual archives in North... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
BenGLab 1

11:00am

Handle with care: Managing radio collections related to the second world war
In the first issue of Phonographic Bulletin in 1971, IASA co-founder and secretary Rolf Schuursma detailed the process of managing historical collections held by the NOS (Netherlands broadcast organization), with a particular focus on recordings of Dutch-language radio during the Second World War. On the occasion of IASA’s 50th conference, this roundtable discussion will revisit this theme of radio collections related to the Second World War. In the European context, heritage institutions have been often faced with limited provenance information, often exacerbated by the turbulent conditions of occupation, war and its aftermath, and the process, in the post-1945 era, by which tape copies were exchanged of materials that had been relocated or dislocated, which were then re-absorbed into national broadcast archives. What kinds of historical materials do radio archives hold today? Are WWII-era recordings still used in radio production or for education purposes, and if so, how? What is the potential for improving knowledge about these materials? And what are the specific challenges to contextualizing such materials today? The roundtable participants will provide insights into the specific recorded sound materials that their respective institutions have acquired and now manage, and the discussion will reflect on the possibilities for further exchange and future cooperation in the European context and beyond.

Speakers
FG

Florence Gillet

Responsible for digital access to collections., CegeSoma (State Archives)
Florence Gillet is history licentiate at the Free University of Brussels (ULB). She has dedicated her thesis to Belgian colonial propaganda in the United States during the Second World War. Since the summer of 2013, she has also obtained a master in Sciences et Technologies de l'Information... Read More →
avatar for Carolyn Birdsall

Carolyn Birdsall

Associate Professor of Media Studies, University of Amsterdam. I'm interested in the early history of radio archiving in Europe and beyond, for which I'm currently starting a new funded, research project "Transnational Conflict Heritage: Radio Collections in Europe, 1930-60". I'd... Read More →
avatar for Richard Ranft

Richard Ranft

British Library
Richard Ranft is Head of Sound & Vision at the British Library, with responsibility for 7 million sound recordings, 280,000 moving image items and 750m newspaper pages, and for bringing them together in digital form to create new services for users of the collections. He currently... Read More →
avatar for Friedrich Dethlefs

Friedrich Dethlefs

Head of the radio department at the DRA, Deutsches Rundfunkarchiv
Friedrich Dethlefs is head of the radio department at the DRA (Deutsches Rundfunkarchiv/German Broadcasting Archive). He oversees the documentation and digitization of the audio collection, which focuses on the recordings of the Reichs-Rundfunk-Gesellschaft (1929-1945) and GDR radio... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Theatre 2

11:00am

Poster session 2
11:00am - 11:30am

Stand 1

The Greek myth in the radio and television archives of RAI’s Teche

Ginevra Rapex, Angela Maria de Cristofaro

Stand 2

History at Home: Community Archival Film Screenings
Rosie Rowe

11:30am - 12:00pm

Stand 1

The J.H. Kwabena Nketia Archives:African Archives Best Practices-A Case Study for In-House Digitization in the Developing World
Nathaniel Kpogo Worlanyo

Stand 2

Public libraries as home for community archives: case of Kyrgyzstan
Jyldyz Bekbalaeva

12:00pm - 12:30pm

Stand 1

Recovering a set of ethnographic music recordings of Mozambique
Susana Belchior and Isaac Raimundo

Stand 2

A Gift from Afar: A "Global South" Manifesto
Pedro Félix

Speakers
avatar for Angela Maria de Cristofaro

Angela Maria de Cristofaro

RAI Teche Supervisor for Tv Documents, RAI
avatar for Rosie Rowe

Rosie Rowe

AV and Film Preservation Specialist/Head of AV Preservation @ ISU University Library, Iowa State University Library
Rosie Rowe is the Audiovisual Preservation Specialist at Iowa State University, designing and implementing AV preservation infrastructure and workflows for the University Library Special Collections and Archives. Rosie has built an in-house AV preservation lab for researcher requests... Read More →
avatar for Pedro Félix

Pedro Félix

integrated researcher, Instituto de Etnomusicologia / FCSH-UNL
Pedro Félix is a researcher at INET-MD since 1997, at Instituto de História Contemporânea since 2013, and collaborates with the Fado Museum since 2005. He has developed fieldwork on musical groups in Portugal, technology, phonographic publishing industry, sound heritage. This work... Read More →
avatar for Susana Belchior

Susana Belchior

PhD Fellow in Conservation & Restoration, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa
I am a PhD fellow in Conservation and Restoration at the Associated Laboratory Requimte and DCR - Department of Conservation & Restoration (FCT/Universidade NOVA de Lisboa), and INET-MD/Instituto de Etnomusicologia - Centro de Estudos em Música e Dança (FCSH/Universidade NOVA de... Read More →
avatar for Ginevra Rapex

Ginevra Rapex

RAI Teche Supervisor for Radio Documents, RAI Radio Televisione Italiana


Tuesday October 1, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
Atrium

11:30am

A study on the current utilization and development strategy of local audiovisual archives
In our daily work and life, various community groups, individuals and units, especially radio and television stations, produce a large number of photos, video recordings, video recordings and other audio-visual materials. And these audiovisual materials, as the first choice of all kinds of information carriers due to the character of real recording, vivid reflecting and specific image, has become an important part of modern library information resources for a long time. Based on the background data analysis of the collection development and opening platform of Shanghai Audio-Visual Archives, the construction of its official website and official WeChat official account, this paper expounds the innovative mode of collection opening and utilization, and studies the advantages and problems to be optimized of this innovative mode.

Speakers
avatar for Jiamin Li

Jiamin Li

Shanghai Media Group
Jiamin Li is Senior researcher and editor of Copyright Assests Centre of Shanghai Media Group(SMG),Shanghai Audio-Visual Archives. She has been engaged in the research and utilization work of audiovisual materials for many years. She has participated in the production and research... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
BenGLab 2

11:30am

Don’t let perfect be the enemy of the good: The balance of increased output and quality preservation
"Don’t’ let perfect be the enemy of the good.” Balancing of increased output and quality preservation. Building on our increased capacity due to an infrastructure upgrade, and planning to maximise functions to meet our digitisation needs, we look forward to a balance of what we know and where we need to go. The NFSA plans to digitise 200,000 items over the next 7 years to meet deadline 2025 utilising technology to manage quality control, digitisation and restoration whilst dealing with a large volume of audio and video ingest. We will do this by increasing access capabilities of an automated programming interface for our batch processing restoration server and looking at pathways for external digitisation and up-scaling current internal preservation workflows we plan to meet our increased digitisation needs.

Speakers
avatar for Ross Garrett

Ross Garrett

Manager, Audio Preservation, National Film & Sound Archive


Tuesday October 1, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
Theatre 1

12:00pm

Presenting the United States presidents
In this panel presentation, Audiovisual Archivists Sarah Cunningham and Laurie Austin will discuss their work at U.S. Presidential Libraries for Harry S. Truman, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon B. Johnson. They will examine changes in how American presidents were documented in sound, film, and video tape over the course of the 20th century. Using examples from their collections, they will illustrate themes that permeated through the presidencies of the three men who held office between 1945 and 1969. Some discussion will also center on how private presidential foundations support the work of their respective libraries and how the libraries fit into the larger National Archives and Records Administration agency.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Austin

Laurie Austin

Audiovisual Archivist, Harry S. Truman Library
Laurie Austin is the Audiovisual Archivist for the Harry S. Truman Library. She has a BA in History from the College of William and Mary and an MA in History/Public History from Northeastern University. Her career in the Presidential Libraries system started at the John F. Kennedy... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
BenGLab 2

12:00pm

Tech obsession
A number of men and women sit around a table in a meeting room and introduce themselves before they speak. "Hi, my name is..." each begins. Then something like, "... and I’m a tech addict." Sound familiar? Ever had this feeling? Is our community, especially for those dealing with digitization and digital preservation, exempt from this problem? We are increasingly confronted with technical specifications that we must adhere to in order to comply with preservation standards, but who among us is really qualified to understand what it is all about? This paper, although conceived by a tech-oriented mind, aims to observe the topic from a different perspective, bringing some real-life examples, to try to give back the right value to technology vs. the human factor, eventually delivering value over tech obsession.

Speakers
avatar for Stefano Cavaglieri

Stefano Cavaglieri

CTO / CIO, Biblioteca nazionale svizzera
Audio re-recording techniques, technology, quality Stefano Sergio Cavaglieri is the Chief Technology and Information Officer of the Swiss National Sound Archives, now a department of the Swiss National Library, in Lugano, Switzerland. His career started back in the late 70's in the... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Theatre 1

12:00pm

The Nuremberg recordings: Listening to the 20th century
The Nuremberg trial was certainly one of the key moments of the 20th century. Only a small percentage of the trial was filmed, but the entirety of its verbatim audio was recorded on two complete sets of lacquer discs, each containing around 4000 disc sides of 15 minutes. The "A" set, recorded on the best type of Presto discs, has been preserved by the International Court of Justice in The Hague, the Netherlands, and has now been moved to the National Archives of the Netherlands. The French GECKO company has completed the digitization and digital restoration of this collection. In this presentation, Emiliano Flores, project manager at GECKO, will discuss the various technical aspects of this outstanding project, revealing new documentary elements along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Emiliano Flores

Emiliano Flores

GECKO
Born in 1975 in Clamart, France, Emiliano Flores graduated in sound engineering in 2000 at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure Louis Lumière (Paris region). From 2000 to 2009, Mr Flores worked as recording, mixing and mastering engineer for independent music labels. In 2009, Mr. Flores... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Theatre 2

12:00pm

The relation of music archiving and intangible cultural heritage in Serbia
Speaking from ethnomusicological standpoint, this paper elaborates the use of recorded sound and audiovisual material for the purpose of documenting particular musical elements in Serbia according to the concept of UNESCO intangible cultural heritage. There is difference between contemporary field recording for the archive according to ICH concept, and the employment of already recorded historical legacy. On the example of music elements from Serbian national register of ICH, this paper will rise the questions of ethnomusicological politics of field recording and digitization of archived historical recordings, but it will also analyze the politics of heritage management in this theme. Based on ethnomusicological and archival experience, the aim of this paper is to offer the model of application of sound archive in future which can effectively contribute to the concept of intangible cultural heritage in Serbia.

Speakers
avatar for Marija Dumnić Vilotijević

Marija Dumnić Vilotijević

Research Associate, Institute of Musicology SASA
Marija Dumnić is Research Associate at the Institute of Musicology of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts. She completed MA and PhD in ethnomusicology at the Faculty of Music of the University of Arts (Belgrade). She is participating at digitization projects (especially for... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
BenGLab 1

12:30pm

Lunch
Tuesday October 1, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Atrium

1:30pm

Audiovisual archives inside science museums: A survey on management and conservation
This paper explores some of the main issues and current trends on the management of science museums’ audiovisual archives, and presents the results of my Master’s dissertation in Science for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage that has been carried on in collaboration with Milan’s Museo Nazionale Scienza e Tecnologia Leonardo da Vinci.
As a restorer, I decided to focus on the issues concerning the long-term preservation of magnetic and optical carriers. They are part of our cultural heritage but have yet to gain an archival and historical value, compared to more traditional media like paper documents or cinematographic films. Furthermore, the great variety of carriers and formats that have been introduced in the last few decades have led to a great uncertainty in the management and conservation of this unconventional kind of media.
The mission of science museums is to preserve our heritage and to record the evolution of technology. Therefore, it is important not only to digitise data, but to ensure the preservation of original carriers and recording technologies as well.
The conclusions of this paper are based on a survey conducted during my research, involving various institutions in Italy and abroad. The survey focused on issues such as the size and importance of every audiovisual archive, access and digitisation strategies, types of carriers and playback technologies, tape and disc degradation, storage conditions. By comparing the results of the survey and the literature on the topic, guidelines on the management and preservation of audiovisual documents inside science museums are presented.

Speakers
avatar for Isabella Otto

Isabella Otto

Restorer and conservation scientist, Istituto di Storia Contemporanea P. A. Perretta
After getting her Bachelor's degree in Conservation of Artworks in Como in 2011, Isabella Otto worked as a restorer in London for five years. In 2018 she got a Master's degree in Science and Technology for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage in Milan, with a research on the preservation... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
BenGLab 1

1:30pm

Ghosts of the popular: Theoretical and historiographic perspectives from the Hidden Years Music Archive
The Hidden Years Music Archive, one of the biggest popular music archives in South Africa, holds alternative popular music from the mid-1960s to the early-2000s; music of musicians from southern Africa who were, for political and commercial reasons, not recorded by mainstream record companies and did not receive radio airtime on the state-controlled and censored South African Broadcasting Corporation. Nevertheless, these musicians managed to attract large followings at concerts, clubs and festivals. Constituted outside contemporary official or national music projects, the archive does not represent a canon of the most prominent musicians of the time, but weaves together the lived experiences of more peripheral popular music artists during the height and demise of apartheid. These musicians, from different racial, class and ethno-cultural backgrounds, regularly performed together in shared public spaces that defied the apartheid laws of the time. The collection of more than 10 tons of material, including many hours of live recordings, photographs, posters, and other ephemera, documents diverse musical styles ranging from urban folk to township jazz, country rock to maskanda and traditional music. This diversity imposes a perspective of multiple agents from diverging social backgrounds drawn into shared popular cultural practices at a critical historical juncture despite opposing socio-political forces. Narratives on mainstream (and similarly censored) popular South African music releases of the time are silent about this history. The Hidden Years Music Archive haunts the memory of South African popular music historiography. This article seeks to explore the ways in which this unorthodox archive challenges our understanding of popular culture under apartheid.

Speakers
avatar for Schalk Van der Merwe

Schalk Van der Merwe

Postdoctoral Fellow, Stellenbosch University
Dr Schalk van der Merwe is an author, lecturer and professional musician that divides his timebetween the classroom, the stage and the studio. He lectured in history at Stellenbosch Universityfrom 2005 to 2017, and as social historian has specialised in popular music. His embeddedexperience... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
BenGLab 2

1:30pm

Two years later: The future of small scale audiovisual archives in Asia
In Berlin 2017, the panelists analyzed innovation and human failure in small scale AV archives and asked the Question what do we need to learn from each other? This panel session had an immense effect since many contributions to the discussion could help in overcoming difficulties that were presented by the panelists. Now, two years later, the same panelists meet again and discuss the outcomes of the learning process and focus on the future of small scale audiovisual archives in Asia. What makes them so special and different form the large archives in broadcasting stations and national institutions? Which type of network will the future bring to the table and in which direction can technical staff, users, administrators, and the immediate community work towards an effective implementation of standards that really help to make knowledge available to all? Taking the discussion again to the institutions in China, Laos, Malaysia and Sri Lanka, this panel will shape a continuity in dedicating professional efforts to one of the most common audiovisual archive organizations in emerging countries of Asia. The outcome of this panel is a number of questions that help stimulate further discussion and draw attention to the weak connection between archival goals and the communal understanding of continuity in some Asian institutions. This is also a creative report of the panel organizer's work as IASA ambassador in this region.

Speakers
avatar for Gisa Jähnichen

Gisa Jähnichen

Prof. (Ecomusicology), Shanghai Conservatory of Music
What do you think I want to hear or talk about? I am interested in supporting small scale archives at educational institutions, training for archivists in these archives, and a holistic approach to an accessible preservation of knowledge. Also, I like to promote the development of... Read More →
avatar for Chinthaka Prageeth Meddegoda

Chinthaka Prageeth Meddegoda

Senior Lecturer, University of Visual and Performing Arts
Chinthaka Prageeth Meddegoda, PhD, is the Director of Research in the University of Visual and Performing Arts in addition to conducting lecturers on North Indian music, theory of music and research and methodology. He is interested in popular and traditional music of various Asian... Read More →
avatar for Ahmad Faudzi Musib

Ahmad Faudzi Musib

Senior Lecturer, Audio Engineer /Sound Synthesis, University Putra Malaysia, Faculty of Human Ecology, Music Department
Contextual Sound Preservation of Local String Instruments
avatar for Thongbang Homsombat

Thongbang Homsombat

Manager of ATML, National Library of Laos
I am the administrator of the Archives of Traditional Music in Laos at the National Library in Vientiane. My main interest is enhancing the unrestricted accessibility of sound and audiovisual material collected over the last two decades in Laos and beyond. I need to learn and to apply... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Theatre 2

1:30pm

W3: Handling and storage of audio and video carriers (IASA-TC 05)
Edited by Dietrich Schüller and Albrecht Häfner, IASA-TC 05 was published in 2014. While IASA-TC 03, presented in another tutorial at this conference, underlines that, ultimately, long-term preservation of audiovisual documents can only be achieved by "eternal" digital content migration, IASA-TC 05 explains that carrier preservation still maintains its important place in audiovisual archiving, as by far not all audiovisual documents have as yet been transferred to digital repositories. Also, IASA-TC 03 strongly recommends that originals be kept for potential future reference. IASA-TC 05 explains how handling and storage of audio and video carriers can be optimised to preserve original holdings until professional long-term preservation can be organised and financed. In this presentation, reference will also be made to specific precautions against the unfavourable climatic conditions in tropical zones.

Speakers
avatar for Dietrich Schüller

Dietrich Schüller

consultant, Phonogrammarchiv, Austrian Academy of Sciences
Dietrich Schüller, retired director of and now consultant to the Vienna Phonogrammarchiv, has been with IASA since 1972. Starting out as cultural anthropologist – his PhD is in African History – he became increasingly involved in technical matters related to audiovisual archiving... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Theatre 1

2:00pm

Digitizing a century of native voice and song at the Autry Museum
The Autry Museum of the American West has received a CLIR Recordings at Risk grant to digitize hundreds of Indigenous songs, field recordings, oral histories, and lectures, and this presentation follows the project over the course of its twelve months. Digitizing a Century of Native Voice and Song at the Autry Museum involves the preservation reformatting of sound and audiovisual recordings on lacquer disc, wire, and magnetic tape. Recordings span from 1898 to 2007 and include songs of the Blackfeet nation, rare LPs from the first Native American-owned record labels, and videotaped performances by Native Voices at the Autry. The digitized collections can benefit tribal language and cultural revitalization efforts, as well as scholars from a wide range of disciplines, so recording metadata, posting finding aids, and enhancing catalog records are also a major part of the project. Since the collection contains recordings of culturally sensitive content, the procedures developed to manage the digital records acknowledge the conditions under which some of the recordings may have been gathered, including possible lack of informed consent by Native individuals or lack of tribal permissions for individuals to share songs or information that are owned collectively. The Autry has constructed a plan to share the digitized recordings with tribal representatives, to consult and collaborate with them to expand documentation of what these materials hold, and to implement the use of Traditional Knowledge Labels in the Autry’s catalog records in consideration of the current wishes of the Indigenous peoples affiliated with the content.

Speakers
avatar for Liza Posas

Liza Posas

Head, Research Services & Archives, Autry Museum of the American West
Hello like-minded people, I am a woman who wears a couple of hats. One is my “Archivist” hat at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage, where I have been since 2005. I currently serve as the Autry’s Head of Research Services and Archives where I manage the reference activities... Read More →
avatar for Yuri Shimoda

Yuri Shimoda

CLIR Recordings at Risk Intern, Autry Museum of the American West
Yuri Shimoda obtained an MLIS at UCLA, with a focus in media archival studies, in June 2019. She is the CLIR Recordings at Risk Intern at the Autry Museum of the American West, a Clerk for Los Angeles Public Library, and an Asset Specialist Intern at Walt Disney Imagineering's Information... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
BenGLab 1

2:00pm

Zdeněk Liška across institutions and materials
Over the course of the past year, Národní filmový archiv in Prague has been rethinking its relationship towards film sound, particularly in the context of collection policy, acquisition of materials connected to film sound and music, their preservation, presentation and related research. This new approach is inter alia represented by a project focused on one of the foremost European film music composers, Zdeněk Liška. Film sound and music research is by its nature an interdisciplinary exercise that needs to make use of approaches from different fields of study (film history, musicology, archival studies, media archeology etc.). That is why one of the aims of the project is to create a methodology of how to connect data that are spread between various types of material as well as several institutions. Even though the main output of the research is a publication focused on Liška's compositional methods and his use of electronics and sound design, questions of typology of sound on film, the ways of connecting information from scores with their manifestation in film, inquiries into period sound engineering techniques and subsequent questions are of an equal importance. The paper will present main research issues and methodological approaches towards integrating information from archival documents (scripts, scores, magnetic film stock) with other data (oral history projects, Barrandov Studios archive) and a comparative examination of the final versions of the soundtracks. Through this, we hope to provide a glimpse of the possible future models of interdisciplinary archival care and scholarship.

Speakers
avatar for Jonáš Kucharský

Jonáš Kucharský

Curator of Music and Sound, Národní filmový archiv, Prague
Jonas Kucharsky is a graduate of the Musicology department of Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. As a part of his bachelor degree has spent a semester at Humboldt University in Berlin and a year at Cardiff University as during his masters degree. He is currently working as... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
BenGLab 2

2:30pm

Rescuing Malawi endangered 16mm film collection
The paper talks about strategies and workflow which the national archives of Malawi is using to digitise 16 mm reel to reel collection. With limited resources, availability of technology and high end film digitisation equipment, the presentation discusses how the institution has overcome these challenges by collaborating with REI Foundation limited and devising a cost efficient means of rescuing this endangered collection which is rapidly deteriorating and fast becoming obsolete. The paper will conclude by discussing experiences, outcomes, strategies, techniques, processes, equipment being used in this project to digitise, preserve and provide access to the digitised reel collections.

Speakers
avatar for Bright Joshua

Bright Joshua

National Records And Archive Services of Malawi
Bright Joshua is a regional archivist and head of the audiovisual section of the National Records and Archives Services of Malawi (NRAS). He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematical Sciences, has worked as an intern at the Bundesarchiv Film Archive in Berlin, Germany. He... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
BenGLab 2

2:30pm

The extraordinary fate of Charles Wolff's record collection
The paper aims at presenting my current research on Charles Wolff (1904-1944), a long-forgotten French writer and journalist who belonged to the very first generation of record critics, collectors and discographers in France. Wolff had an extraordinary fate that ended tragically. A member of the Parisian bohème in the roaring twenties, Wolff later took part to the Spanish civil war as a volunteer and was part of the French Resistance during World War II. He was tortured to death in 1944 at the age of 39. His massive record collection (18,000 records) was one of the biggest in France at that time. This collection also had an uncommon destiny: it was plundered by the Nazis at the beginning of the war and kept hidden during 15 years, before it was finally restituted to Wolff's family in the mid 50's. It is now part of Radio France record collection. Based on previously unissued archives from the Wolff family, I'm currently working on a radio podcast to tell this story. As the vice-chair of the IASA DIscography Committee, I also would like to share it with the other members of the association.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Henry

Thomas Henry

Ceints de bakélite
78 rpm record collector and researcher from France, creator of the Ceints de bakélite blog. Vice-chair of IASA Discography Committee, Ambassador of IASA for France.


Tuesday October 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
BenGLab 1

3:00pm

Refreshments
Tuesday October 1, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Atrium

3:30pm

National archives section open meeting
Speakers
avatar for Irfan Zuberi

Irfan Zuberi

Project Manager, National Cultural Audiovisual Archives, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts
Irfan has been involved with the arts for nearly 20 years as researcher, cultural consultant, editor, festival curator and audiovisual archivist. He holds a Master of Philosophy Degree from Delhi School of Economics with a thesis titled ‘Theodor W. Adorno’s Theory of the ‘Culture... Read More →
avatar for Richard Ranft

Richard Ranft

British Library
Richard Ranft is Head of Sound & Vision at the British Library, with responsibility for 7 million sound recordings, 280,000 moving image items and 750m newspaper pages, and for bringing them together in digital form to create new services for users of the collections. He currently... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
BenGLab 1

3:30pm

Aviary: Improving searchability and usability of audiovisual collections
Access to audiovisual content continues to lag behind that of textual and still image content. Its time-based nature means it is tremendously underserved. Typically access is only offered as a static description of the entire audiovisual object, forcing users to spend large amounts of time scrolling through content in order to find what they need. However, current technology makes it possible to create automated transcriptions from audio, which can be used to implement granular search tools with high degrees of accuracy. This, together with building visualization tools that give the user to power to navigate audiovisual content easily, constitutes a unique opportunity to enhance access to audiovisual collections. With this need in mind, AVP and the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University worked together to develop a solution to support improved access to audiovisual archives. Aviary, a subscription-based, multi-tenant access platform, brings enhanced search and navigation to audiovisual content, providing access to audiovisual assets through time-stamped transcripts, indexes, and annotations. Closed captioning, audio description of video content, and granular access permissions are all core features that Aviary supports, increasing discoverability, and capabilities for access by all types of users. Researchers are able to search for content across all member institutions’ collections at once, making Aviary a great resource for scholarly pursuits. This paper explains the challenges of providing effective audiovisual access, and demonstrates the strategies that tools, such as Aviary, are using to overcome these obstacles to improve searchability and usability of audiovisual collections.

Speakers
avatar for Pamela Vizner

Pamela Vizner

Consultant, AVP
Pamela is a media archivist from Chile with international experience in film, video, audio and digital preservation, specializing in collection management and digitization workflows. Pamela began her career in sound archives as an audio engineer and later developed an interest in... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Theatre 1

3:30pm

Time-based media: Innovating and maintaining can coexist with open source
We at the Studs Terkel Radio Archive (in partnership with the Chicago History Museum and the Library of Congress) and the American Archive of Public broadcasting (a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH) are serious about preservation, access, and engagement. Our presentation will showcase how each archive is developing and using innovative open source technologies to create a richer user experience and how they have enhanced the archival processing and accessible experience. In demonstrating the tools at our hands (ears?) we will focus on how innovation can indeed coexist with and support maintenance and core operations of the archive. Some of the tools that we will feature include open source collections management systems, speech-to-text software, crowdsourcing platforms,archival remix suites, and tools for automating metadata. Additionally, WGBH and the American Archive of Public Broadcasting will demo the new Archival Management System (AMS 2.0), an instance of Avalon/Hyrax (initially developed by Indiana University and Northwestern), based on the open source Samvera technical stack. We will also share new features on the AAPB and STRA websites, and AAPB will report on outreach efforts around their Transcribe to Digitize challenge while STRA will showcase youth created content based on the archive. We hope that those in the audience will be able to take what we have done and incorporate them into their workflows, improving access and preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Casey Davis Kaufman

Casey Davis Kaufman

Associate Director, Media Library and Archives, WGBH Educational Foundation
Casey Davis Kaufman is Associate Director for WGBH Media Library & Archives & Project Manager for the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. Casey manages outreach, access, digitization, and oversees websites. She previously worked for American Experience & received her MLIS from... Read More →
avatar for Karen Cariani

Karen Cariani

Executive Director Media Library and Archives, WGBH Educational Foundation
The WGBH Medial Library and Archive and the American Archive of Public Broadcasting have thousands of hours of audio-visual materials. I am interested in system to preserve this material, and make it as accessible as possible in a digital form/on-line, and using computational tools... Read More →
avatar for Allison Schein Holmes

Allison Schein Holmes

Archivist, WFMT & WFMT Radio Network


Tuesday October 1, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Theatre 2

4:00pm

Intellectual property right as part of preservation standards
A lot of material may be published online but as long as we are not certain on intellectual property right (IPR) or even ethical problems, archives will keep the material hidden. Only on a one by one basis a call for publication or re-use will be investigated. As an archive that holds 36 petabytes of AV-material, The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision wants to break through this dilemma. The archive underlines the principles of OAIS (open archival information system), therefore its activities and priorities are derived from the users needs (the so called designated community). To meet those needs the archive maintains a metadata structure that gives easy access to its material. Recently metadata on IPR was added to this structure, to register the IPR-metadata that is needed to make an informed decision on publishing our AV material. The way the IPR-metadata was defined is based on Premis, the international metadata standard for preservation metadata. Rights is one of the core entities of this standard. Even though the standard is very generic and abstract, we managed to decompose our specific needs and create a structure that complies with this standard. We would like to illustrate this with some examples.

Speakers
avatar for Marjolein Steeman

Marjolein Steeman

Senior Media Manager Optimisation, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
Marjolein Steeman is a specialist on data management and has been associated with the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision on several projects as a data- and business analyst. Recently she helped develop a framework for a Preservation Metadata Dictionary, based on the international... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
BenGLab 1

4:00pm

Long-term, migration-free preservation of audiovisual content
Long term preservation of audio-visual content has been ongoing challenge for archivists. Due to a lack of long-term storage mediums, archivists have had make do with short-term mediums, creating risk of data loss and requiring significant funds for migration or for online active storage. For example, Europe’s second oldest radio broadcaster, Czech Radio has a rich archive of national and international value with recording digitised and stored on a tape-based solution. Despite applying best practices of digital preservation, Czech Radio was at risk of losing its most valuable radio recordings over time, with threats such as bit rot during tape migrations, software and hardware obsolescence, and the unpredictability related costs. Using new and innovative technology, Piql worked with Czech Radio to provide a digital master copy that will keep the most valuable sound recordings available and accessible 500 years into the future. We improved the metadata descriptions of the contents and ensure best practice according to open source guidelines. This allowed us to write file format specifications as readable text on the film to ensure the files can be retrieved regardless of technology development. The content written to piqlFilm never has to be migrated and can be kept in Czech Radio’s archive for centuries.This purpose-built, ground breaking technology is the result of years of research and development, supported by the EU and other global investors. The potential impact of this technology for audio and visual archives is significant as the only offline, migration-free, digital storage medium available.

Speakers
avatar for Bendik Bryde

Bendik Bryde

Business Development Manager, Piql AS
Digital preservation, digital archives, offline data solutions, Arctic World Archive.


Tuesday October 1, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Theatre 1

4:30pm

AI AI O[H]: Speech recognition, text analysis, and oral history
The presentation explores collaboration between the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky and the National Library of Australia to research and experiment with speech recognition and text analysis technologies as applied to oral history transcription and access workflows in the archive. The National Library of Australia’s collection has 24,000 oral history interviews totalling over 50,000 hours, and the Nunn Center’s collection has over 12,000 interviews that total over 20,000 hours. Both the Nunn Center and the NLA created successful time-synchronization and search systems to enhance discovery and access to online oral histories that involve timed summaries and indexing as well as synchronized transcription. The search and user experience in both OHMS and AMADS is optimized when users are presented with both a timed-summary / OHMS index as well as a verbatim transcript, yet affordability of verbatim transcripts is becoming increasingly unattainable. Doug Boyd and Kevin Bradley will present the results of their experiences incorporating automatically generated text and text analysis into their accessioning and access workflows and explore the advantages and limitations of these technologies in the context of automation and AI, especially concerning archived oral histories.

Speakers
avatar for Doug Boyd

Doug Boyd

Director, Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the University of Kentucky Libraries
Doug Boyd directs the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.


Tuesday October 1, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Theatre 1

4:30pm

An uncertain but hopeful future: Freeing out of commerce works
So-called “out of commerce works” are any works such as films and audiovisual materials etc. that are in copyright but are not commercially available, leading to a situation where these works are inaccessible to the public. The new EU Copyright Directive, which is due to be legally approved in 2019, will enable cultural heritage institutions to obtain licenses from representative organisations to use these out of commerce works for non-commercial purposes. This licence may be extended to legally apply to similar out of commerce works which are not represented by the organisation. Furthermore, the Directive will also allow cultural heritage institutions to make copies available online of these works for non-commercial purposes without a license, where there is no representative organisation to obtain a license from. These proposed new regulations could be indispensable for archives who wish to utilise the often large number of out of commerce works in their collection, and to provide public access to this shared cultural heritage. This would benefit both the archives who want their collections to be explored and used; as well as the public who do not currently benefit from our vast collective cultural heritage.
This presentation seeks to address the potential benefits of the out of commerce provisions that film or sound and audiovisual archives could utilise. It also seeks to address the ambiguity of the proposed legal provisions and to explore whether and how these provisions could be successfully implemented in existing archival practice.

Speakers

Tuesday October 1, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm
BenGLab 1

4:30pm

Retrospect and prospect of electronic records long term preservation endeavor in Taiwan
With the rapid growing of information technology, thousands of born and derived electronic records such as audio, video, document files are generated and collected each day in National Archives Administration (NAA), Taiwan, R.O.C. In order to properly preserve those cultural, historical electronic records in a long term fashion, NAA launched a National Records Digitization Service Program in 2008. In this program, NAA closely cooperated with universities and research institutes and established governance, guidelines, standards, and utility programs. Based on the first phase achievement, the Preserving Electronic Archives and Records Laboratory (PEARL) was established in 2010 and an open source technology platform was developed to assist NAA and other organizations, such as government agencies, universities, and private organizations, to migrate and manage electronic records in a unified manner. PEARL also provides media migration services to help our clients to digitize or migrate vinyl, tapes, films, slides, and micro films. A full-day training course is provided each year since 2010. Up till now, more than 500 archivists or IT personnel participated the course. PEARL also engage in the international cooperation, visitors from more than 20 countries or regions have visited our Lab. Currently, we are working on a research project about how to apply the artificial intelligence/machine learning techniques to promote the advanced usages of electronic records.

Speakers
avatar for Shin-Chung Shao

Shin-Chung Shao

Dr. Shin-Chung Shao is a consultant and former director of the Electronic Archives and Records Long Term Preservation Lab. National Archives Administration, Taiwan, ROC. Dr. Shao holds a M.S. in Operations Research degree from Columbia University, and a Ph.D degree in Business Administration... Read More →


Tuesday October 1, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Theatre 2

4:30pm

Training and education committee closed meeting
Speakers
avatar for Will Prentice

Will Prentice

British Library


Tuesday October 1, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
BenGLab 2
 
Wednesday, October 2
 

8:30am

Registration
Wednesday October 2, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
Atrium

9:00am

Broadcast archives section open meeting
Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
BenGLab 1

9:00am

Drawing the floor plans of your future
In January 2019, the UCLA Ethnomusicology Archive celebrated the re-opening of its newly renovated and expanded facilities, the result of nearly four years of planning and project management, and many more years of advocacy. And floor plans -- many, many floor plans. It was a rare, once-in-a-generation opportunity to reimagine our physical plant and the workflows and interactions it would support, not from the ground up, but from the stripped-down frame of our existing location. This presentation is a critical reflection on that process of advocating, planning, negotiating, reacting, learning, recalibrating, and making the best of whatever came our way. In the spaces that resulted from this process, you can see clearly the tension between the ideals expressed in, for example, IASA-TC 05, and the reality of the budgetary and structural parameters that we had to work with. And although the renovated facilities ultimately fall short in many ways, they also offer deeply needed major improvements over our previous space, and a starting place for further improvement. Most of all, our experience highlights the need to be ready to think and act quickly in response to both the initial good fortune, and the inevitable challenges that follow, in such a project.

Speakers
avatar for Aaron Bittel

Aaron Bittel

Director of World Music Archives and Music Librarian, Wesleyan University
Aaron M. Bittel is Director of the World Music Archives and Music Librarian at Wesleyan University. He previously served as Archivist-Librarian and Head of Digital Projects for the UCLA Ethnomusicology Archive, one of the largest and oldest ethnographic audiovisual archives in North... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
BenGLab 2

9:00am

Sangam music: Mobile application as an outreach tool of the National Cultural Audiovisual Archives of India
A significant part of the digital repository of National Cultural Audiovisual Archives (NCAA) features hitherto unpublished classical, folk and contemporary music. Prior to systematic metadata creation, conservation and digitization under the aegis of NCAA, their parent analogue recordings had been languishing in the archives of several governmental and non-governmental institutions across India. During the ongoing pilot phase of NCAA, following its successful certification as a Trustworthy Digital Repository by way of clearing the ISO 16363:2012 audit, it was envisaged that an attempt be made at curating select archival recordings and pushing them to users via a focused mobile application. Sangam Music has been created in collaboration with an industry partner to occupy a similar space as JioSaavn Music, Gaana, Wynk and other mobile applications in the Indian market. This paper will discuss the yearlong journey towards making nearly 5000 audio tracks available through Sangam Music a reality and discuss various aspects of its creation, including seeking permission from partnering institutions, creating a robust yet easy-to-use metadata schema, implementation of dynamic adaptive bit-rate streaming and digital rights management in a rapidly evolving environment of mobile applications.

Speakers
avatar for Irfan Zuberi

Irfan Zuberi

Project Manager, National Cultural Audiovisual Archives, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts
Irfan has been involved with the arts for nearly 20 years as researcher, cultural consultant, editor, festival curator and audiovisual archivist. He holds a Master of Philosophy Degree from Delhi School of Economics with a thesis titled ‘Theodor W. Adorno’s Theory of the ‘Culture... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
Theatre 1

9:00am

Training and education committee open meeting
Speakers
avatar for Will Prentice

Will Prentice

British Library


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am
Theatre 2

9:30am

Collect now, use later: Enabling future research
The Österreichische Mediathek has to collect, document, and preserve the audio-visual cultural heritage of Austria and to make it available to the public. Our proposed paper is dedicated to one of the crucial aspects of archival practice: Collecting the past for future generations and for future research in the humanities and social sciences without, however, knowing exactly the needs and interests of future users and scientists. We will discuss the corresponding aspects of collecting and preserving for the future and metadata in detail – focusing the collection of oral history interviews. What is worth collecting? Are there different strategies regarding collecting for the current use compared to collecting for a future use? How to handle the diverse analogue and digital carriers from many different sources? How to deal with the varying standards and levels of information regarding their integration in our existing databases? The collection of oral history interviews in the Österreichische Mediathek now contains thousands of hours of recordings from the 1970s to the present. Basically, our paper reflects the experiences we gathered during different collecting projects within the last years.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Linsboth

Christina Linsboth

Österreichische Mediathek
Christina Linsboth joined the Österreichische Mediathek in 2016, where she currently serves as assistant to the Head; her main research interest are acquisition policies, archival theories and methodologies; she worked on a project with the aim to collect, document and digitise interviews... Read More →
avatar for Gabriele Fröschl

Gabriele Fröschl

Head of Österreichische Mediathek, Österreichische Mediathek
Head of Österreichische Mediathek, specialised in scientific projects, web-expositions, cataloguing


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am
Theatre 1

9:30am

Preserving Chilean independent media: Past, present, and future of the Señal 3 Audiovisual Archive
Señal 3 is a volunteer-run community TV station in Santiago, Chile, located in the working class neighborhood of La Victoria. During the 17 years of dictatorship, La Victoria was, in many aspects, a resistance hub. It was and remains a socially and culturally active neighborhood. Señal 3 has been documenting Chilean history through the eyes of its community; the images that this collection holds are unique in that depict stories that are often untold or unacknowledged. Señal 3 is also active in organizing educational activities for the community and is continuously developing outreach programs to support other community organizations in Chile and Latin America. In 2016, Señal 3 partnered with NYU’s Audiovisual Preservation Exchange program, a collaboration that resulted in the creation of an inventory and the implementation of a video digitization station. Later, Señal 3 established a partnership with Universidad de Chile to support an internship program, which allowed the digitization of part of the collection and the establishment of initial digital preservation activities. In 2019, Señal 3 received national funds to strengthen digital preservation efforts, support the use of archival material for production, and more importantly, to create a website to provide access to their content. The vision for this project, to kick off in March of 2019, goes beyond Señal 3’s collection, and hopes to establish the foundation of a national movement for the archiving of community collections. In this paper, we want to share and analyze our process, focusing on what’s next to come.

Speakers
avatar for Pamela Vizner

Pamela Vizner

Consultant, AVP
Pamela is a media archivist from Chile with international experience in film, video, audio and digital preservation, specializing in collection management and digitization workflows. Pamela began her career in sound archives as an audio engineer and later developed an interest in... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am
BenGLab 2

9:30am

UNESCO on the air: The digital transformation of a global radio history
In 2017, UNESCO Archives launched the two-year initiative ‘Digitizing Our Shared UNESCO History’. In this context, thousands of hours of sound recordings, including master tapes of UNESCO Radio programmes, are being digitized and will soon be available public. UNESCO Radio was different, unique even, according to some listeners. UNESCO began to produce radio programmes in the late 1940s with an aim to promote the ideals of the Organization, through discussion of issues in the fields of education, science, culture and communication. This paper will trace the 50-year history of UNESCO Radio, illustrating the Radio’s important and unconventional role in the development of radio, in the context of a far-reaching mass communications programme. The subjects chosen by UNESCO Radio are as relevant today us they were to those wishing to build the ‘defences of peace in the minds of men and women’ following the devastation of the two World Wars. Feature programmes were produced each year in English, French, Spanish or Russian. Their subjects covered a vast field ranging from aids to astronomy, biodiversity to bioethics, street children to indigenous peoples, women’s rights to racial politics. UNESCO Radio’s catalogue contains hundreds of recordings and scripts offered to national, public and community radios globally, as well as to international shortwave broadcasters. Virtually forgotten today, this paper will shed light on the Organization’s rich radio heritage, while discussing the efforts and challenges of transforming this remarkable piece of radio history to digital form and bringing it to light for a new generation of listeners.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Cowling

Adam Cowling

Records Management Specialist / Digitization Project Manager, UNESCO
Adam Cowling is Records Management Specialist at UNESCO. He is the Project Manager for UNESCO’s ‘Digitizing Our Shared UNESCO History’ digitization project and ‘Putting a World of Pictures into Words’ transcription crowdsourcing initiative. He holds a dual Masters degree... Read More →
avatar for Eng Sengsavang

Eng Sengsavang

Reference Archivist, UNESCO
Eng Sengsavang is Reference Archivist at UNESCO. She holds a dual Masters degree in Archival and Library Studies from the University of British Columbia, Canada. As an archival specialist, she has previously worked for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the United Nations Archives... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am
BenGLab 1

10:00am

How do tomatoes sound, 1969-2019?
2019 is the year of the 50th anniversary of the so-called "tomato incident", in which a 1969 Amsterdam audience of theatregoers performed a historic intervention into the antiquated institution of Dutch theatre by pelting the stage with tomatoes. The audio documentation of this incident’s afterlife is part of the vast collection of the Dutch theatre sound archival collection of “Theater Klank en Beeld” (Theatre Sound and Vision). In this presentation the sound documentation of “Aktie Tomaat” serves as a case study for strategies of recent public re-use of recordings, connecting past, present and a potential future of an archive of “theatre on tape” (Hoefnagels, IASA Phonographic Bulletin, 4, 1972). Who listens to theatre culture’s historical recordings? How does a 1969 heritage of sound reconnect with a 2019 theatre culture? What are the challenges of the current internationalization in education in making local historical recordings accessible? And what are the opportunities for access strategies? These are the questions which in this paper will be centrally discussed.

Speakers

Wednesday October 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
Theatre 1

10:00am

How television archiving became a tool for saving radio and providing access to indigenous culture and language
The story of how a government agency and an independent archive have co-operated to build an expanding archive of audio and visual resources supporting the indigenous culture and language. This presentation begins with a brief introduction to the government agency Te Māngai Pāho and the audio-visual archive Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision and the landscape in which they operate. Then an overview of the 10 year history of the broadcasting archive contract and its expansion over time to support radio as well as television and then the recovery of legacy archival material from around the country. This includes an explanation of Punganet technology, the Iwi radio network, Māori Television Service and use of commercial providers and how the archive approached the challenges inherent in this contract. A further explanation of the importance of one to one relationships and how these were built up over time and maintained with limited resources and changing personnel and how the larger message of the archive was disseminated so that the radio stations became hubs for the collection of local audio (and video) media. There will be examples of the various projects that have resulted from this including the Te Hiku Media Project, Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua television series and the Ngā Taonga Kōrero online exhibitions. While celebrating this success, the talk will discuss plainly the issues still facing this programme of work and the types of solutions being looked at.

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Lean

Jamie Lean

Principal Archivist, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
Jamie Lean is the Principal Archivist for Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision, the New Zealand Archive of Film, Television and Sound. He has had over two decades of experience in acquisitions, storage and digitisation of audiovisual media in new Zealand. In that time he has led development... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
BenGLab 1

10:00am

Records management and archiving training in Malawi: A cry for help
On 11th December, 2019, the Malawi National Commission for UNESCO in collaboration with National Archives of Malawi organised a two-day conference of records management and archives technical professionals. The aim of the conference was to find out the challenges being faced in both private and public institutions charged with managing various types of records including academic, financial, security and personnel records in both paper and audiovisual formats, and with that information suggest possible solutions. The following were some of the challenges that were reported by the 27 institutions that attended the conference: People think the way information is being managed is normal and therefore there is resistance to change; Information is being managed by people who are not professionals in the field; There is no space in the archive rooms which are more or less dumping rooms; Digitization machines and processes are very costly; There is lack of networking among records managers and archivists at national level looking into record management issues in institutions; Of all the more than 17 public and private universities in Malawi only Mzuzu University teaches library information science at degree level and none teaches records management and archiving per se. This presentation will therefore, in pictorial format, present the situation of the 27 institutions that participated in the aforementioned conference particularly their challenges and the solutions they have proposed with the aim of inviting partnerships in the development of relevant training programmes for Malawi.

Speakers
avatar for Chimwemwe Sumani

Chimwemwe Sumani

Information Technology Specialist, Malawi National Library Service
Chimwemwe Sumani is an Information Technology Specialist and a Head of ICT, Audiovisual and Culture Departments for Malawi National Library Service (MNLS) since September, 2009. She has been a trainer and technical personnel for all Malawi National Commission for UNESCO’s Audiovisual... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
Theatre 2

10:00am

Red Iberoamericana de Preservación Digital de Archivos Sonoros y Audiovisuales (RIPDASA)
The Ibero American Network for Digital Preservation of Sound and Audiovisual Archives start to work in research activities in 2019 under the sponsorship of the Iberoamerican Programo of Science and Technology (CYTED).The main goal if RIPDASA is to incentive the link beetween researches and professionals of the sound and audiovisual archives in Iberoamerica around digital preservation in order to mitigate the risk of loss of this cultural heritage and to ensure its access to future generations. The RIPDASA is coordinated by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) and has the participation of the Universidad de la República de Uruguay, The Universidad Andina, Sede Ecuador; Universidad San Martín de Porres, Peru; The Universidad Complutense de Madrid, the Universidad de Chile, The Universidad de Bahía of Brazil, as well as the Universidad Uniagustiniana of Colombia. WeAreAVP was also part of this initiative. This initiative is unprecedented in the region because of all the assets that exist, the most forgotten are the sound and audiovisual. The risk of loss of heritage is not only the analogue archives that have not been digitized but also those of digital origin. There are few research groups, especially in Latin America. This instead of being a weakness is a strength because based on the situation of each country, the experience and knowledge accumulated around digital preservation will design solutions that are suit to each social context. During 2019, the RIPDASA will focus on the identification and diagnosis of the audio and audiovisual Archives of Ibero-America.

Speakers
avatar for Perla Olivia Rodríguez Reséndiz

Perla Olivia Rodríguez Reséndiz

Investigadora/ Researcher, Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliotecológicas y de la Información de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México


Wednesday October 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
BenGLab 2

10:30am

Refreshments
Wednesday October 2, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Atrium

11:00am

Branding the archiving job to the African youth
In most parts of Sub Saharan Africa today and in Cameroon in particular, the job of the archivist seems to have been abandoned in the hands of the elderly or the aging. Most young people believe that the archiving profession is not prestigious enough as opposed to other professions which seem to have been highly branded. Reasons why they shy away from it or the few who engage as archivist are not proud of their jobs. This in turn affects how the profession is practiced, be it in the audiovisual or paper domain, but also threatens the future of archiving and records management in this part of the glob.
This presentation seeks to present findings on why the young people are shying away from the RM profession, how the field can be branded to attract the youthful population and what are the stakes if intentional action is not taken in this direction. Methods used in this research where both qualitative like one on one interviews, focus groups and qualitative through the distribution of questionnaires and discussions on social media platforms. Findings demonstrate that records management and archiving are paid lesser attention in most Sub Saharan African countries due to the fact that it has been termed the job for the old and branding can be a great mile stone to solving the problem.

Speakers
avatar for Nfor Beri

Nfor Beri

Head Librarian and Archivist, Summer Institute of Linguistics(SIL)
Miss Nfor Beri is a young Information and Communication Specialist, a swon-in Archivist with over 5 years of experience working in some National and International Institutions and Organisations. She has a bachelors degree in Library and Information Sciences and a Masters in Environmental... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Theatre 1

11:00am

Clean and link your metadata with alignments
Good, consistent metadata is essential to find content in an archive. Many institutions use thesauri to structure and unify their metadata. Keeping a thesaurus up to date and of consistent quality is already a major challenge, and now there is the additional challenge of realizing the promise of Linked Open Data in practice. For instance, thesauri can be used to make connections to various distributed collections of cultural heritage objects. In this presentation Sound and Vision will showcase two cases where alignments play a central role. Alignments of thesaurus entries with reliable external sources offer solutions for not only ensuring thesaurus quality, but, more importantly, for tackling the challenge of linking to external vocabularies. The first use case centers around cleansing our thesaurus of a historical legacy of thousands of unvalidated concepts of various origin. The second one involves music and library sources such as Discogs and Wikidata that we use to both enrich our thesaurus and add information to these sources themselves, in the form of alignments. This opens the doors to the wealth of possibilities offered by Linked Data, which we will elaborate on in our presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Manders

Tim Manders

Sr. Media Manager Optimisation, Exploration department, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
Tim Manders works at the Exploration department of the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision. He is experienced in operationalising automatic annotation techniques such as speaker labeling, thesaurus label extraction and face recognition, applied on daily ingest into the archive... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
BenGLab 1

11:00am

New Phonograph: Modular technology, workflow, and collaboration
The Czech Republic’s New Phonograph project brought audio preservation to the forefront of the nation’s cultural agenda for the first time. Having little in the way of legacy systems to cope with, this has enabled us to focus entirely on what we want our collections to look like in the future, and plan our strategy accordingly. On the technological side of things, we are seeking a modular, extensible workflow framework, which informs our hardware and software investments, while at the managerial level we would like to establish a concrete means for networking with other institutions whose interests resonate with our own, commissioning access to each other’s technological environments on a per-task basis.
The topics will be:
A technological overview of key parts of our workflow, from DIY to off-the-shelf, and how we are striving for long-life solutions.
A focus on the Endpoint Cylinder Transfer Machine, its role within the context of the project (encompassing research outcomes as well as document digitisation), selection criteria, why we favoured extensibility.
Where we are now: with the first Endpoint in Europe, and few options for Central and Eastern European states to access cylinder digitisation, we would welcome collaboration and a reciprocal environment for sharing access to such technologies where possible, facilitated by a simple platform for registering resources and making requests.
How we intend to proceed in encouraging more open cross-collaboration in Europe, beginning with neighbours, aiming to create more accessible handbooks, toolkits, contacts and other informative resources available at a continental level.

Speakers
avatar for Anthony Allen

Anthony Allen

Sound Engineer, Národní Muzeum
Anthony is a sound engineer from Scotland. His background includes live and studio recording, audio restoration, and commercial audio. He manages audio transfer and digitisation, covering shellac, lacquer and vinyl discs as well as phonograph cylinders. He also contributes to more... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
BenGLab 2

11:00am

Core developments in audiovisual metadata: A standards update
In this panel, representatives of PBCore and EBUCore will discuss the latest developments in the standardization of audiovisual metadata and how those standards can be implemented in real-world use cases. PBCore is primarily an XML-based standard, while EBUCore is both an XML-based standard and a fully-fledged RDF ontology. In 2015, PBCore and EBUCore began the process of developing a roadmap between PBCore XML to EBUCore RDF by unifying the existing vocabularies of both metadata standards. As a result of the NEH-funded PBCore Development and Training Project, a mapping between the two standards is now complete and available on the updated PBCore website, along with updated tools and documentation supporting standardized audiovisual metadata (including a Cataloging Tool, an XML Validator, and improved MediaInfo support, among others). The panel will include demonstrations of the new website and metadata tools, a discussion of the use cases for the PBCore and EBUCore data models and semantic web applications, and a conversation about the future of a/v metadata, including the implications of AI for metadata enrichment.

Speakers
RF

Rebecca Fraimow

Digital Ingest Manager, WGBH
Rebecca Fraimow received an MA from New York University's Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program in 2013 and was part of NDSR-Boston's first cohort. She has since continued working at WGBH as the Digital Ingest Manager, PBCore Project Lead, and Program Coordinator for the... Read More →
avatar for Jean-Pierre Evain

Jean-Pierre Evain

Principal Project Manager, EBU
Jean-Pierre Evain joined the EBU in 1992 after several years spent in the R&D laboratories of France-Telecom (CCETT) and Deutsche Telekom (FI/FTZ). As Principal Project Manager, he is a member of the “EBU Technology and Innovation Department”. He is an expert in data and new media... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Theatre 2

11:00am

Poster session 3
11:00am - 11:30am

Stand 1

The future life of past conversations - making historical interviews available for scientific research
Johannes Kapeller

Stand 2

Audiovisual preservation at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation and open access to scientific and technological knowledge in health
João Guilherme Machado

11:30am - 12:00pm

Stand 1

School of Music Audio Recordings at the University of Illinois: A Case Study of Audio Preservation Workflow
Miyuki Meyer and Cristina Kühn

Stand 2

The Greek myth in the radio and television archives of RAI’s Teche
Ginevra Rapex, Angela Maria de Cristofaro


12:00pm - 12:30pm

Stand 1

History at Home: Community Archival Film Screenings
Rosie Rowe

Stand 2

The J.H. Kwabena Nketia Archives: African Archives Best Practices-A Case Study for In-House Digitization in the Developing World
Nathaniel Kpogo Worlanyo


Speakers
avatar for Angela Maria de Cristofaro

Angela Maria de Cristofaro

RAI Teche Supervisor for Tv Documents, RAI
avatar for Cristina Kühn

Cristina Kühn

Media Preservation & Digital Reformatting Project Manager, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Born and raised in Miami, Cristina's work always revolved around local libraries, museums and special collections. But it was a rare job as an archivist at the Lynn and Louis Wolfson II Florida Moving Image Archive of Miami Dade College that officially introduced her to the world... Read More →
avatar for Johannes Kapeller

Johannes Kapeller

Media Archivist, Österreichische Mediathek
Johannes Kapeller is media archivist at the Österreichische Mediathek since 2003. He studied Cultural Anthropology and Communication science at the University of Vienna. His main work areas are Public Relations, Project Management, Visitor Care and Cooperations. Since 2016 he is... Read More →
avatar for Rosie Rowe

Rosie Rowe

AV and Film Preservation Specialist/Head of AV Preservation @ ISU University Library, Iowa State University Library
Rosie Rowe is the Audiovisual Preservation Specialist at Iowa State University, designing and implementing AV preservation infrastructure and workflows for the University Library Special Collections and Archives. Rosie has built an in-house AV preservation lab for researcher requests... Read More →
avatar for Ginevra Rapex

Ginevra Rapex

RAI Teche Supervisor for Radio Documents, RAI Radio Televisione Italiana
avatar for Miyuki Meyer

Miyuki Meyer

Audio and Video Specialist, University of California, San Diego
Miyuki Meyer is the Audio and Video Specialist at the UC San Diego Library. She has previously worked in the Media Preservation Unit at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Libraries as a graduate assistant and interned at the 'Ulu'ulu Moving Image Archive of Hawai'i. In... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
Atrium

11:30am

Historical sound documents in Germany
There have been several attempts at researching the history of the record industry in individual countries and to reproduce the various labels. Although Germany was the cradle of the disc record industry from the 1890s and the world’s leading exporter for decades until the last 78s were pressed in 1959, no such overview has yet been undertaken. The paper discusses the problem of locating, reproducing and describing every single type of record label ever manufactured in Germany, including dating them and providing capsule company histories. The coverage includes phantom discs, hearsay discs, picture discs, phono cards, 150 rpm talking doll discs, and other oddities and rarities for both local consumption and export around the world: Europe, Africa, the Near and Middle East, Asia, Australia and New Zealand, North and South America. What's needed is a tool for private and public archives and collections to correctly file any record of German make.

Speakers
avatar for Rainer E. Lotz

Rainer E. Lotz

Dr. Rainer E. Lotz, an economist and mechanical engineer by education, is a retired civil servant (development aid) and lecturer in political science. As a consultant and development bank manager he had worked in the Near East, Latin America, South East Asia and East Africa. He is... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
BenGLab 2

11:30am

Seeing the big picture: A data science approach to making sense of archival collections via Jupyter notebooks
Many organisations have trouble getting an overview of their data. A particular challenge for the archival community is that their data spans a large time period, during which systems and policies for creating metadata have changed, and even the meaning of the metadata itself, as language evolves. Archivists often struggle to answer questions such as: How many hours of television do we have? What percentage of the material is digital? What content do we have relating to migration? This information is essential to manage archival processes such as digitisation, and to select relevant content for individual users (recommendations) and for exhibitions. Scholars and journalists accessing the archive also need an overview of the type and content of material available, and the completeness of its metadata. At the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, we have developed a data science approach for creating overviews of archive collections. We use Jupyter Notebooks, 'live' documents containing code, visualisations and narrative text. With these notebooks, we provide an up-to-date 'shop window' overview to interested parties, while allowing users with programming skills to flexibly create their own overview. Most importantly, we embed knowledge of the archive history and processes in the notebooks, to correctly assemble data fragments into the big picture. In this paper, we describe how our approach has been successfully applied to create overviews for diverse archive collections, including our own. We will discuss how these overviews support users in their work, and present the results of evaluations with scholars and archivists.

Speakers
avatar for Mari Wigham

Mari Wigham

Software Developer, The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
Mari Wigham is a software developer at the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, working on innovative ways of helping scientific researchers to work with the archive. She studied electronic engineering, and has spent her career working in applied research institutes, on projects... Read More →
avatar for Liliana Melgar

Liliana Melgar

The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
Liliana Melgar is a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University investigating how to support Scholarly Video Annotation in the Dutch infrastructure for the digital humanities CLARIAH. She has been involved since 2016 in the CLARIAH project as part of the work package on audi... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
BenGLab 1

11:30am

Why I am an (broadcast) archivist
Celebrating IASA’s 50th anniversary is no mean feat. During my career as an archivist in Radio and Television - 23 years with IASA - I realised that only the far-sighted had all along appreciated the true value of broadcast content archives. Ironically, it was not the substantial investment in producing and acquiring content that prompted broader recognition, but the digitisation of archives. With easier access and ‘cheaper’ content re-use and re-purposing, archives were recognised as extensive and valuable sources of the content needed for a multi-channel multi-platform environment. Doing extensive research for a master’s degree dissertation a few years ago, I was impressed by the challenges the broadcasters in Southern Africa faced to preserve its collections. During a recent summit for Southern African Broadcasters it was clear that funding is still a huge prohibitor to bring the archives to its full value and prevents full scale digitization projects. In stark contrast was my work for a commercial broadcaster to build the ideal television archive to re-use, re-purpose and license content. Reflecting over my career, my passion for what I do, IASA’s role in my development as an archivist brought me to the point where I would like to share my story to relate to a future I imagine for Southern African public broadcasters’ radio and television archives that possibly can help prevent the potential loss of their story while shaping the future of the archives for generations to come. My paper will look at potential solutions for the dilemma.

Speakers
avatar for Shubha Chaudhuri

Shubha Chaudhuri

Archives and Research Centre for Ethnomusicology, American Institute of Indian Studies
Shubha Chaudhuri has a Phd in Linguistics. She has been with the Archives and Research Centre for Ethnomusicology of the American Institute of Indian Studies since its inception in 1982, and Director since 1985.In the field of audio-visual archiving her major interests have been database... Read More →
avatar for Ilse Assmann

Ilse Assmann

After studying and then teaching music for four years, Ilse Assmann took up a post at the SABC (South African Broadcasting Corporation) in 1985 as Assistant Archivist in the Radio Archives, collecting and cataloguing South African contemporary music. In 2013 Ilse accepted a position... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
Theatre 1

12:00pm

MPWARA syndrome: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
In conversations with early-career archivists, especially those working in maturing and community-based organizations, or with previously overlooked or neglected formats such as A/V and born-digital materials, one phrase recurs and resounds: "My predecessor wasn’t a real archivist." The stories that accompany this phrase share many characteristics and common features, and provide the basis of an epidemiological profile for what we call MPWARA Syndrome — that is, the unique challenges of working in the wake of archival laborers who are differently informed from those with MLIS degrees or other graduate credentials (and, frequently, acting at cross-purposes with them). Although collections of all kinds pass through this phase as they mature, audiovisual and digital archivists are especially likely to be the first formally trained specialists in their institutions. Presenters will discuss their own experiences with these challenges and provide specific, actionable, critical approaches to teaching and thinking about archival practice that honor emerging and established standards alongside other ways of knowing and doing.

Speakers
avatar for Snowden Becker

Snowden Becker

Independent Archives Consultant and Expert
SNOWDEN BECKER has been a leader in the field of media archives and preservation for nearly twenty years. She is a co-founder of the international Home Movie Day event and the non-profit Center for Home Movies, which was awarded the SAA Hamer Kegan Award for archival advocacy in 2017... Read More →
avatar for Tre Berney

Tre Berney

Director, Digitization and Conservation Services, Cornell University Library
Tre is the Director of Digitization and Conservation Services at Cornell University Library in the Digital Scholarship and Preservation Services (DSPS) department. He oversees the Audiovisual Preservation Lab, the Imaging and Scanning labs and the Conservation Lab. Tre is also the... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Theatre 1

12:00pm

A novel steganographic process to ensure error-free digital recording and transmission of audio
Ever since general-purpose personal computers have been used for digital audio recording, users
have been plagued by reliability issues caused by the broad unsuitability of these devices for the
task. In critical applications, recorded material has to be carefully listening-checked, which is
time-consuming and error-prone. A new DSP process is described which allows recorded audio
files to be rapidly and reliably checked for any such errors. The same process can be used to
verify digitised audio streams in real-time.

Speakers
avatar for Ian Dennis

Ian Dennis

Prism Sound
Ian Dennis is a consulting hardware, software and DSP engineer specialising in audio and multimedia systems.From 1987 to 2018 he was Technical Director of the Prism Sound group, a UK manufacturer of audio A/D and D/A converters, test and measurement equipment, SADiE audio workstations and Imerge media servers.Ian has been designing audio equipment since 1979, when he landed his dream job as an int... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
BenGLab 2

12:00pm

Concepts and data in audio preservation: A meaningful relationship
What do we talk about when we talk preservation metadata? There is a meaningful relationship between the concepts applied in the preservation of audio media, and the structured descriptions (metadata) used to document the media as well as the preservation process. By examining a complete case study, this article aims to make a case for the importance of defining a clear conceptual model and of making it explicit through open documentation. Too often preservation metadata is presented at implementation level, for example in the form of an XML schema, as a way to avoid discussing the conceptual model which is missing. In this presentation, I argue that (1) when we talk preservation metadata, it deserves recommendation to study and define concepts before moving over to the data itself, and (2) that the right way to encode concepts into a formal language (such as XML) requires reversibility. By that I mean that we should not aim to produce a metadata set that is neat, with granularity as the first sign of sophistication, but a structured description that allows future human readers to infer the value and principles that inhabit our archival ethos and that motivated us to encode our culture this way.
The article aims to contribute to the development of a full theory of information preservation, while at the same time providing a complete example of data sheet ready to use: from the conceptual model to the database documentation (SQL) and the software to ingest and retrieve data.

Speakers
avatar for Federica Bressan

Federica Bressan

Researcher, Ghent University
Federica Bressan (1981) is a Fulbright scholar and Marie Curie alumna. Currently she is a postdoctoral researcher at Ghent University, Belgium, and appointed Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia. She holds an MD in Musicology and a PhD in Computer... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Theatre 2

12:30pm

Lunch
Wednesday October 2, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Atrium

1:30pm

Featured presentation: Lossless compression and other stories from the New York Public Library audio and moving image initiative
Following a Mellon Foundation funded audio and moving image (AMI) collections survey, the New York Public Library established the AMI Initiative to preserve more than a quarter-million recordings identified as at risk or mission critical. The Library’s Audio and Moving Image Preservation program has had to rapidly evolve to meet the expectations of preserving more items per year than it had in its first decade of digitization. Staff skills, workflows, and specifications have transformed to better respond to resource constraints and program sustainability, with increased use of scripting, open source tools, and notably, lossless compression for all digitized AMI formats. Meanwhile, additional services are being tested and implemented while repository expansion is underway. Examples include new mechanisms for staff access as media is queued for ingest, and web accessibility improvements such as viewer features, transcripts, captioning, etc. With more than 180,000 recordings digitized by the end of 2019, along with the infrastructure improvements underway, the Library continues to meet major benchmarks in its goals for the audio and moving image collections. This presentation will discuss lessons learned, current work, and plans for continued progress.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Holte

Rebecca Holte

Manager, Audio and Moving Image Preservation, New York Public Library
Rebecca Holte manages the Audio and Moving Image (AMI) Preservation Program at the New York Public Library, and has held various roles in the Library’s Preservation Division since 2010. Rebecca directed AMI program expansion to meet the goals of the Library’s AMI Initiative, which... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Theatre 1

2:15pm

Plenary
Speakers
avatar for Toby Seay

Toby Seay

Professor, Music Industry, Drexel University
Toby Seay is Professor of Music Production and Chair of the Department of Arts & Entertainment Enterprise at Drexel University. As an audio engineer, he has recorded numerous Gold, Platinum, and Grammy winning records. Toby’s research interests include audio preservation practices... Read More →


Wednesday October 2, 2019 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Theatre 1

2:30pm

PV1 – The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
(Limited to 45 people, in 3 groups)
The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, the host institution for this year’s conference, holds an impressive collection of millions of hours of radio, television, film, pictures and music recordings, and this collection is growing daily. During the visit, you will learn about the history of the institute, have a tour around the building and visit the depot.

Learn more: www.beeldengeluid.nl/en
Meeting place will be confirmed closer to the date.
*on 30 September and 1 October during the lunch breaks we will also offer small group tours to see the digitisation equipment (20-30min). You will be able to sign up for these tours during the conference.


Wednesday October 2, 2019 2:30pm - 5:30pm
External Netherlands

2:30pm

PV2 - The Music Centre of Dutch Public Broadcasting
(Limited to 15 people)
The Music Centre of Dutch Public Broadcasting is a vibrant cultural centre and a concert hall with rehearsal and recording facilities. It is the home of the Radio Philharmonic Orchestra and Broadcaster Choir. The centre houses an extensive collection of sheet music - around 450,000 items, 60,000 of which online available online via muziekschatten.nl. During the tour, we will learn about the history of this organisation and have a look around the collection of sheet music, books and radio magazine.

Learn more (in Dutch): www.mcogebouw.nl 
Address: Heuvellaan 33, 1217 JL, Hilversum (walking distance from the conference venue, meeting place will be announced closer to the date)


Wednesday October 2, 2019 2:30pm - 5:30pm
External Netherlands

2:30pm

PV3 - Eye Collection Centre
(Limited to 24 people, in 2 groups)
Eye Collection Centre is the home of the Eye film museum collection of Dutch and foreign films. Based in the North of Amsterdam, the archive holds more than 40,000 films (contained in more than 200,000 film cans) and more than 500 metres of paper archives. The Collection Centre is a building for conservation and restoration and it is open for professionals who want to access and study the collections. The centre has a small cinema where new restorations can be viewed. During the tour, we will have a tour around the depot and will visit the restoration and digitisation departments.

Learn more: www.eyefilm.nl/en/collection/about-the-collection/collection-centre
Address: Asterweg 26, 1031 HP Amsterdam 



Wednesday October 2, 2019 2:30pm - 5:30pm
External Netherlands

2:30pm

PV4 - Stedelijk Museum
(Limited to 15 people)
Stedelijk is the largest Dutch museum dedicated to modern art, contemporary art and design. First opened in 1895, the museum is renowned for one of the richest modern art collections in the world. It features over 90,000 artworks and objects, dating from 1870 to the present. The tour will take us behind the scenes to the museum’s depot where we will learn about the museum’s conservation strategy.

Learn more: www.stedelijk.nl/en
Address: Museumplein 10, 1071 DJ Amsterdam


Wednesday October 2, 2019 2:30pm - 5:30pm
External Netherlands

2:30pm

PV5 - the University of Amsterdam Special Collections
(Limited to 10 people)
From medieval manuscripts, atlases and manuscripts to wall charts, font designs, cookery books and cartoons, the Special Collections are home to the material heritage of the University of Amsterdam. The heritage in the Special Collections represents many different disciplines in the arts and sciences, and includes countless irreplaceable, museum-quality works, both ancient and contemporary. The collections serve educational and research purposes, but they are also there for the general public. We will visit the depots with the theatre and music collections.

Learn more: https://bijzonderecollecties.uva.nl/en/
Address: Meibergdreef 29, 1105 AZ Amsterdam


Wednesday October 2, 2019 2:30pm - 5:30pm
External Netherlands

2:30pm

PV6 - Netherlands Institute for Conservation, Art and Science
(Limited to 15 people)
Netherlands Institute for Conservation, Art and Science (NICAS) is a multidisciplinary research institute, uniting the disciplines conservation, art history and science. NICAS aims to consolidate and develop the connections between these disciplines in the form of a cohesive research programme in close cooperation with and active involvement of the cultural heritage field, with as its main research themes the origin of the artwork and the life of the artwork through time.

Learn more: www.nica-institute.com/
Address: Hobbemastraat 22, 1071 ZC Amsterdam


Wednesday October 2, 2019 2:30pm - 5:30pm
External Netherlands

2:30pm

PV7 - Rijksmuseum
(Limited to 30 people, in 2 groups)
The world-famous Rijksmuseum is a Dutch national museum dedicated to Dutch arts and history from the Middle Ages up to and including the 20th century. It is the most visited museum in the Netherlands. Along artworks like Rembrandt’s Nightwatch, several paintings by Vermeer, van Dyck and Jan Steen, the museum has an exceptional collection of antique objects of the material Dutch culture, as well as a vast collection of prints, drawings and photography. During the tour, we will visit the museum's image and print departments and learn about their preservation and digitisation strategies.. We have been fortunate to secure 30 tickets (in 2 tour groups of 15 each).

Learn more: https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en
Address: Museumstraat 1, 1071 XX Amsterdam


Wednesday October 2, 2019 2:30pm - 5:30pm
External Netherlands

9:00pm

Screening at Eye Filmmuseum
Free to registered delegates.
_underscore_ is an initiative of the Eye Museum, RE:VIVE (Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision) and The Rest is Noise (Muziekgebouw’s concert series for adventurous and experimental music) inviting composers of experimental and electronic music to create new scores for silent films from the collections of Eye and Sound and Vision. It gives artists the opportunity to gain experience writing scores, an art form that requires specific skills and gives these lost films a new lease on life, reviving them for contemporary audiences.

Lamellen - Het gestolen huurtcontract (1924, Dick Laan)
Rimer London and Waterlelyck are Lamellen. The duo channel an 80s pastiche with their love of well worn synths and drum machines. Their score for Het gestolen huurcontract accentuates Dick Laan’s slapstick cat and mouse direction and the jubelience of daydreaming teenage summers.
Laura Agnusdei - Benny heeft het aan zijn haart (1926, Dick Laan)
Laura Agnusdei is an Italian saxophonist and student at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague’s Institute of Sonology. A classically train saxophonist she fuses its sound with acoustic, digital and analogue sound sources to craft sonic landscapes that shift between melody and textured narratives. Her score for Benny heeft het aan zijn haart is moody yet playful, leaning heavily on her casio drum machine, it walks a fine line between “yakkity sax” and Blade Runner.
The screening will take place at the Eye Museum in Amsterdam.

About Eye Filmmuseum
Eye Filmmuseum is the Dutch national film institute and museum for film heritage and the art of film in the Netherlands. Eye was founded in 2010 as a result of a merger between four organizations: the Netherlands Filmmuseum, Holland Film, the Filmbank, and the Netherlands Institute for Film Education.
Located in Amsterdam North, Eye manages an internationally recognized collection spanning the entire history of film from the first silent films to the most recent Dutch releases. Eye researches, collects, preserves, digitizes, restores, presents and provides access to a collection that illustrates film art, culture, and heritage relevant to the Netherlands. The collection includes approximately 50,000 films (60% of which are foreign films), but also music scores, photographs, posters, archives from filmmakers and organizations, apparatus, and an extensive library collection.


Wednesday October 2, 2019 9:00pm - 11:00pm
External Netherlands
 
Thursday, October 3
 

8:30am

Registration
Thursday October 3, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
Atrium

9:00am

W6: The composition of digital audio and video files
As more and more collection objects are born-digital and non-physical in nature, archivists must develop core competencies regarding the fundamental nature of digital objects. Just as knowledge of the chemical composition of cellulose (for example) is essential for the care and maintenance of paper materials, the knowledge of file construction at a bit-level is essential for archivist to make careful decisions about what are and are not unique characteristics of a given digital collection object and how best to determine sustainable and safe care and maintenance plans for the digital collection object over time. This tutorial illustrates the fundamental binary elements of digital audio and video objects, from bits to bytes to formal format structures. The tutorial will demonstrate methods for understanding and interpreting these many technological layers, including how to translate bytes into understandable information based on file format specifications, and how to distinguish file object information from file system information in order to understand the true boundaries of a digital object within a given computer system.

Speakers
avatar for Bertram Lyons

Bertram Lyons

Partner, Senior Consultant, AVP
Bertram Lyons provides digital preservation consulting and training for the Society of American Archivists, the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, the FBI, the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
Theatre 2

9:00am

W4: Overview of IASA-TC 06 Guidelines for Video Preservation: Formats, Carriers and Workflow
IASA-TC 06 Guidelines for the Preservation of Video Recordings was published online as modules in early 2018 (https://www.iasa-web.org/tc06/guidelines-preservation-video-recordings). This workshop will walk participants through the technical details of each section of the guidelines including the video carriers, signal and signal extraction as well as planning, setup, and workflows for video digitisation. IASA-TC 06 identifies six classes of video recordings, each with its own strategies and methods to support the long-term preservation of the underlying content. For the most part, the scope for the initial edition of IASA-TC 06 is limited to the digitisation of "class 1," analogue videotapes, and transfer of content from selected types of digital videotapes. Work is ongoing, with later editions planned to cover born-digital video, metadata, and the production of new video recordings in preservable formats. The discussions of target formats for digitised video will include updates on new standards work for the Matroska and MXF wrappers and the FFV1 codec. This interactive session will give participants the opportunity to gain an understanding of the first version of these in-depth guidelines. Participants will also be able to provide feedback and comments on the existing sections of IASA-TC 06 as well as help shape the forthcoming planned sections on born-digital video content.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Bubestinger-Steindl

Peter Bubestinger-Steindl

Peter Bubestinger-Steindl studied Media Computer Science at the Technical University in Vienna.He has worked as a project leader and developer in the field of digital archives since 2002.As employee of NOA, he set up and developed solutions for both television and radio archives and... Read More →
avatar for Andy Martin

Andy Martin

Operations Manager at DAMsmart
Andrew is the Operations Manager at DAMsmart, heading up all technical operations. With over 11 years at DAMsmart, Andrew has been at the forefront of ensuring all DAMsmart’s projects, large and small, have been a success.Andrew is responsible for the technical requirements and... Read More →
avatar for Lars Gaustad

Lars Gaustad

Head of moving image preservation, National Library of Norway
Lars Gaustad is head of moving image preservation at the National Library of Norway. The library holds the heritage collection of moving images in Norway as well as being responsible for handling the legal deposit of film and television. He has chaired the Technical Commission of... Read More →
avatar for Carl Fleischhauer

Carl Fleischhauer

IASA Technical Committee
Carl Fleischhauer worked on a variety of digitization and digital preservation projects at the Library of Congress beginning in 1983. His more recent projects at the Library include the Format Sustainability Web site and coordination of the Audio-Visual Working Group of the Federal... Read More →
avatar for Somaya Langley

Somaya Langley

Digital Curation Manager, University of Sydney
Somaya Langley has a background in the arts and culture, broadcast, festivals, information technology, archives and libraries. The past two decades of her career is reflected in having worked at each stage of the digital content production lifecycle. She prefers to take a holistic... Read More →
avatar for Kate Murray

Kate Murray

Digital Projects Coordinator, Library of Congress
Kate Murray is the Digital Projects Coordinator in the Digital Collections Management and Services at the Library of Congress where she leads the Federal Agencies Digital Guidelines Initiative (FADGI) Audio-Visual Working Group and the Sustainability of Digital Formats website. Prior... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 9:00am - 12:30pm
Theatre 1

9:00am

W5: Safeguarding the RTS broadcast lacquer discs: challenges of a multifaceted project
The 80,000 lacquer disc audio recordings of RTS (Radio Télévision Suisse) are a unique collection spanning from the 1930s to the 1950s. The disc collection covers contents including radio dramas, classical music, and news reports, among many others. The various types of lacquers used throughout the years make this collection an interesting case study, from a chemist and/or a curator point of view. The digitization of these broadcast archives is an 8-year long service provided by the French GECKO company.

Patricia Herold will mention the FONSART organization and its overall history in safeguarding and promoting archives. She will speak about the various steps in setting up the RTS discs safeguarding project, and she will present a comparison of the Visual Audio optical digitization technique, compared to the standard stylus playback technique. Mrs. Herold will briefly mention the history of the various sub-collections. The partnership with the GECKO company, in terms of logistics, cataloguing, digital file integration, and monitoring the production done by GECKO will be mentioned.

Eric Monge, IT manager at GECKO, will present MADAMS, GECKO's in-house workflow and database management system. Karen Beun, production manager, will focus on the technical workflow, and go into details about the metadata provided and the various disc playback techniques used throughout the project. Finally, Emiliano Flores, restoration manager, will present the digital restoration aspect of the project.

Rebecca Rochat, preventive preservation expert, will present her digital guide with the results of her several-year long research on lacquer discs, which is expected to be an important landmark for all specialists of the topic. A chemist and microscopic approach to the deterioration of lacquer discs will be developed.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Beun

Karen Beun

Production manager 78rpm, Gecko
Karen Beun, production manager 78rpm at GeckoAfter a master's degree in Arts and Technologies specializing in the restoration of sound archives, I let myself be carried by the electroacoustic current, the questions of the medium, material, sound recording... which led me to Gecko... Read More →
avatar for Emiliano Flores

Emiliano Flores

GECKO
Born in 1975 in Clamart, France, Emiliano Flores graduated in sound engineering in 2000 at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure Louis Lumière (Paris region). From 2000 to 2009, Mr Flores worked as recording, mixing and mastering engineer for independent music labels. In 2009, Mr. Flores... Read More →
avatar for Eric Monge

Eric Monge

Information Technology Manager, Gecko
Eric Monge is the Information Technology (IT) manager at the french Gecko company. He is responsible for creating and maintaining the MADAMS (Media Asset Digitization and Archiving Management System), the proprietary workflow management software that is used in every digitization... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Rochat

Rebecca Rochat

University of York
Graduated in conservation with a major in technical, scientific and horological objects from the University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland (2017), Rebecca Rochat worked for 3 years on the RTS lacquer discs digitisation project, with a keen interest in studying the typology... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 9:00am - 12:30pm
Twitter Large, Media Park

9:00am

W7: FFmpeg for audio-visual archivists (1)
Over the past many years, an ecosystem of free and open source software for long-term digital preservation has been developed. One of the tools is FFmpeg, a solution for processing, transcoding, filtering, analysing, and playing audiovisual files. Due to its extensive and actively developed codec library, FFmpeg has been integrated as a crucial element into many film and video archives worldwide. This workshop will present why FFmpeg is relevant to archivists and how it can be applied for digital preservation of the the cultural heritage. Participants will learn how to install the software on their computers and master the use of it with audiovisual files. They will use the applications (FFmpeg itself includes a suite of applications) to perform several tasks, including lossless transcoding, technical inspection, timecode burn-in, compression for access, and quality control. Lessons and hands-on activities will alternate. Topics will include a refresher on digital audio and digital video; file structure: container, codec, raw data; different file formats for different purposes: archive master, mezzanine files for postproduction, access files; and audiovisual data transformations.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Ng

Joshua Ng

Digital Preservation Analyst, Archives New Zealand
I am the Digital Preservation Analyst at Archives New Zealand (ANZ). I am responsible to ensure processes are in place to maintain the integrity of the Government Digital Archive. My work includes the drafting of digital preservation policy and strategy, researching digital preservation... Read More →
avatar for Reto Kromer

Reto Kromer

founder, AV Preservation by reto.ch
Having graduated in mathematics and computer science, Reto Kromer became involved in audio-visual conservation and restoration thirty-three years ago. He has been running his own preservation company, AV Preservation by reto.ch, and lecturing at the Bern University of Applied Sciences... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 9:00am - 12:30pm
BenGLab 2

10:30am

Refreshments
Thursday October 3, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Atrium

11:00am

W13: Europeana Media: Using IIIF/AV to improve online audiovisual collections
Large swaths of publicly available audiovisual archives collections across Europe have been linked and made available to Europeana, Europe’s cultural heritage platform. The Europeana Media project aims to increase the appeal, visibility, reuse, research of and interaction with moving image and sound materials on the platform. By building on the IIIF/AV framework, our aim is to deliver functionalities that will offer researchers, educators and the public at large functionalities to better access and incorporate AV content from Europeana into their daily living and working environments, such as video fragment quoting, support for subtitling, and embedding media. This workshop will go into the aggregation and publishing landscape for European AV collections and outline the technical challenges related to unifying streaming output from various collectaions and sources. We are curious to hear attendees' own streaming approaches and solutions!

Speakers
avatar for Sally Reynolds

Sally Reynolds

Director, ATiT
Sally Reynolds: an Irish national with a background in remedial linguistics, Sally first worked in radio and television in Ireland as a presenter and producer for the national broadcaster, RTE specialising in educational programming. From 1990 onwards, she worked in technology enhanced... Read More →
avatar for Mathy Vanbuel

Mathy Vanbuel

Co-director, ATiT
With a background in audio-visual production, Mathy worked for the audio-visual service of the Catholic University of Leuven for more than 15 years as director and production manager. Since 1998, Mathy is co-director of ATiT. He is regularly called upon to offer consultancy services... Read More →
avatar for Erwin Verbruggen

Erwin Verbruggen

Product manager digital scholarship & knowledge sharing, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
Erwin Verbruggen is a user studies and digital preservation expert who works on several (inter)national projects in the field of preservation and open data. Erwin obtained an MA in Preservation and Presentation of the Moving Image at the University of Amsterdam. He interned at the... Read More →
avatar for Marco Rendina

Marco Rendina

International projects coordinator, Istituto Luce - Cinecittà
Marco is a senior project manager and metadata specialist. He works with Istituto Luce - Cinecittà, where he has been in charge of the development and realisation of various digitisation and applied research projects. He has led the participation of Luce in several EU co-funded audiovisual... Read More →
avatar for Abiodun Ogunyemi

Abiodun Ogunyemi

User researcher/UX specialist, German National Library of Science and Technology
Abiodun received his PhD at Tallinn University in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. He has over 10 years academia-industry knowledge. Presently, he works in the lab for Non-textual materials at the German National Library of Science and Technology as User Researcher/UX studies... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
Theatre 2

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday October 3, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Atrium

1:30pm

W10: A bluffers guide to sound and digital audio (part 1)
The bluffers guide is aimed at anyone who would like to better understand sound and audio. It will demystify the myths and jargon by explaining the fundamentals in a simple and pragmatic way. Whether you are a technician or a researcher, a manager or administrator ....within an audio visual archive you will contribute to the processing of audio as we move from legacy to modern digital archive. Make sure you understand the decisions you are making. 

Part 1 of 2 complimentary training workshops.

In Part 1, we will use demonstrations to explore the relationship between frequency and pitch, amplitude and loudness, and harmonics and timbre. We will seek to understand how we quantify and measure sound and why this is important to audio quality and the way we archive content.

Speakers
avatar for Neil Garner

Neil Garner

Director, Training for TV Ltd.
After studying music at the University of Surrey and teacher training in Bath, Neil Garner joined the BBC as a Post Production Operator, working on a wide range of tasks from transmission to telecine and editing to quality assessment.In 1990 he joined the team at the BBC Academy’s... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Theatre 2

1:30pm

W11: NEMOSINE - The future of media storage
NEMOSINE is an EU founded project for the development of Innovative packaging solutions for storage and conservation of 20th century cultural heritage of artefacts based on cellulose derivatives.
The objective of project NEMOSINE www.nemosineproject.eu is to improve traditional storage solutions by developing an innovative package with the main goal of energy saving and extending the life time of cultural objects based on cellulose derivatives. In contrast to conventional film cans or media boxes, the packages will be equipped with the latest sensor technology to monitor decomposition processes and adsorb decomposition products such as acetic acid. The focus is on films, photographs, posters, slides, cinematographic sound, magnetic tapes and discs, based on cellulose acetate and its derivatives. The aim of the four-year project is to achieve more efficient long-term archiving and to increase the life cycle of audiovisual media, as well as other objects of cultural heritage and arts.

Beyond the state of the art, NEMOSINE is developing the following modular and integrated products:
  • High O2 barrier and active packaging using non-odour additives
  • Active acid adsorbers based on functionalized Metal Organic Framework (MOFs) integrated in innovative porous structures
  • Gas detection sensors based on nanotechnology for monitoring degradation products,
  • Multi-scale modelling to correlate degradation & sensor signals for maintenance prediction and integrate all these technologies
  • Packaging with modular design to fulfill the technical & economical requirements of the different cultural heritage items made by cellulose derivatives and
  • Curative packages containing controlled release of natural antifungal additives. 

    The modular solution is one of main advantages of the innovative package. This design will allow to provide different versions of the product with more or less technology included in the solution: Protective (basic and premium model), and Curative (for damaged products). In this way, the smart package can be adapted to different type of final clients –private collectors, national museums, regional collections, councils and institutions, schools-, in terms of necessities, balancing real value of the content and the package cost. The complete solution for storage boxes proposed by NEMOSINE is based on multi-nano sensors for different gases (mainly acetic acid and nitric oxide) and a control software platform that simulates degradation processes and then will predict accurate protective treatments.

Speakers
avatar for Kerstin Herlt

Kerstin Herlt

EU Projects Coordinator, DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
Kerstin Herlt (F) is project coordinator at DFF - Deutsches Filmmuseum & Filminstitut in Frankfurt/Main. She is mainly working on EU funded projects dealing with digitisation, access, digital curation and conservation of archival film. From 2015-2017 she was head of office of ACE... Read More →
avatar for Nadja Wallaszkovits

Nadja Wallaszkovits

Head of Audio Department, Phonogrammarchiv & NOA GmbH
avatar for Juan Ignacio Lahoz Rodrigo

Juan Ignacio Lahoz Rodrigo

Head of Conservation, Valencian Film Archive
D. JUAN IGNACIO LAHOZ RODRIGO is head of conservation of the Filmoteca Valenciana (Institut Valencià de Cultura), responsible for the restaurations, preservation, storage and cataloguing of the film materials and also is in charge of the equipment and software for the film collections.Lahoz... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Theatre 1

1:30pm

W8: Improving metadata in DPX files: Open source tools and guidelines from FADGI
The US Federal Agency Digital Guidelines Initiative (FADGI), in conjunction with AVP, is developing a new open source tool for format validation and batch embedding and correcting metadata within DPX file headers. Named "embARC" for "Metadata Embedded for Archival Content," the software application has flexible functionality to follow both required SMPTE metadata rules as well as those defined by FADGI in the document "Guidelines for Embedded Metadata within DPX File Headers for Digitized Motion Picture Film," including tracking the digitization workflow. The DPX format is a raster image format often used for the image only data for scanned motion picture film with each frame of film translating to a separate file. Because there are many thousands of frames for each title, there are typically many thousands of DPX files to manage. FADGI’s research into DPX implementations discovered that there are often inconsistencies within the file’s structure and header information.These scope and scale issues make file management a challenge. The embARC tool enables users to audit and correct internal metadata of both individual files or an entire DPX sequence while not impacting the image data. embARC will be released as a beta version early in 2019 with a first official release in summer 2019.

Speakers
avatar for Bertram Lyons

Bertram Lyons

Partner, Senior Consultant, AVP
Bertram Lyons provides digital preservation consulting and training for the Society of American Archivists, the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, the FBI, the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution... Read More →
avatar for Kate Murray

Kate Murray

Digital Projects Coordinator, Library of Congress
Kate Murray is the Digital Projects Coordinator in the Digital Collections Management and Services at the Library of Congress where she leads the Federal Agencies Digital Guidelines Initiative (FADGI) Audio-Visual Working Group and the Sustainability of Digital Formats website. Prior... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Twitter Large, Media Park

1:30pm

W12: FFmpeg for audio-visual archivists (2)
Over the past many years, an ecosystem of free and open source software for long-term digital preservation has been developed. One of the tools is FFmpeg, a solution for processing, transcoding, filtering, analysing, and playing audiovisual files. Due to its extensive and actively developed codec library, FFmpeg has been integrated as a crucial element into many film and video archives worldwide. This workshop will present why FFmpeg is relevant to archivists and how it can be applied for digital preservation of the the cultural heritage. Participants will learn how to install the software on their computers and master the use of it with audiovisual files. They will use the applications (FFmpeg itself includes a suite of applications) to perform several tasks, including lossless transcoding, technical inspection, timecode burn-in, compression for access, and quality control. Lessons and hands-on activities will alternate. Topics will include a refresher on digital audio and digital video; file structure: container, codec, raw data; different file formats for different purposes: archive master, mezzanine files for postproduction, access files; and audiovisual data transformations.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Ng

Joshua Ng

Digital Preservation Analyst, Archives New Zealand
I am the Digital Preservation Analyst at Archives New Zealand (ANZ). I am responsible to ensure processes are in place to maintain the integrity of the Government Digital Archive. My work includes the drafting of digital preservation policy and strategy, researching digital preservation... Read More →
avatar for Reto Kromer

Reto Kromer

founder, AV Preservation by reto.ch
Having graduated in mathematics and computer science, Reto Kromer became involved in audio-visual conservation and restoration thirty-three years ago. He has been running his own preservation company, AV Preservation by reto.ch, and lecturing at the Bern University of Applied Sciences... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
BenGLab 2

3:00pm

Refreshments
Thursday October 3, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Atrium

3:30pm

Executive board and officers of committees and sections closed meeting
Speakers
avatar for Toby Seay

Toby Seay

Professor, Music Industry, Drexel University
Toby Seay is Professor of Music Production and Chair of the Department of Arts & Entertainment Enterprise at Drexel University. As an audio engineer, he has recorded numerous Gold, Platinum, and Grammy winning records. Toby’s research interests include audio preservation practices... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
BenGLab 1

3:30pm

W10: A bluffers guide to sound and digital audio (part 2)
The bluffers guide is aimed at anyone who would like to better understand sound and audio. It will demystify the myths and jargon by explaining the fundamentals in a simple and pragmatic way. Whether you are a technician or a researcher, a manager or administrator ....within an audio visual archive you will contribute to the processing of audio as we move from legacy to modern digital archive. Make sure you understand the decisions you are making. 

Part 2 of 2 complimentary training workshops. In Part 2, we will demonstrate how we turn analogue sounds into digital signals. We will look at the importance of sampling, quantisation, data rates, and the importance of error management. Finally we will look at choosing a compression algorithm and what happens if we reduce the size of a file.

Speakers
avatar for Neil Garner

Neil Garner

Director, Training for TV Ltd.
After studying music at the University of Surrey and teacher training in Bath, Neil Garner joined the BBC as a Post Production Operator, working on a wide range of tasks from transmission to telecine and editing to quality assessment.In 1990 he joined the team at the BBC Academy’s... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Theatre 2

3:30pm

W9: Quality control for media digitization projects
Participants in this workshop will gain hands-on experience identifying and interpreting QC-related audio and video issues. They will have the option of working through an online course module prior to the workshop to begin developing critical listening skills for QC work with audio. The workshop will also feature discussions of the differences between quality control and quality assurance, the types of quality control, and applying risk management strategies to the QC endeavor. A laptop is advised in order to get the most out of the workshop. Files for use in the workshop will be made available for download in advance.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Casey

Mike Casey

Mike Casey is the Director of Technical Operations for audio and video for Indiana University’s Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative, which has digitally preserved more than 310,000 audio and video recordings to date. He is the co-author of Sound Directions: Best Practices... Read More →


Thursday October 3, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Theatre 1

7:00pm

IASA 50th Anniversary Dinner
IASA 50th Anniversary Dinner, Thursday 3rd October, 19:00- , Amsterdam
Price €50 per person for a three-course meal with drinks. Additional tickets at €75 are available for those bringing accompanying partners and guests who wish to attend only the dinner. Advance booking for dinner tickets is required during registration. There will be a live jazz band and a cash bar open after the meal.
Location
The dinner will take place at De IJ-kantine restaurant in Amsterdam.
De IJ-kantine is a contemporary industrial styled restaurant café situated in the former canteen of the NDSM shipyard. The restaurant is equipped with an impressive 18-metre long bar, high ceiling, rough steel look and feel and a breath-taking view over the river IJ.
Dinner
The dinner will be a sit-down three-course meal. The restaurant chefs are designing a special seasonal menu for us to experience the best of the local cuisine. During dinner, you will be entertained by live music performance, and you can also expect a few surprises! If the weather permits, you’ll be able to socialise with your IASA colleagues and our friends from JTS conference in the outside terrace with a stunning view towards Amsterdam. There will be a cash bar open after the meal.
We will contact you with the details about the menu shortly.
Transport
The restaurant is conveniently located just across the river IJ, a 15-minute ferry ride away from Amsterdam central train station. To reach the location, you can take a free ferry from the central station towards NDSM-werf, see the schedule here. The central station is within easy reach of Hilversum by train.


Thursday October 3, 2019 7:00pm - 9:00pm
External Netherlands